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AHS Subject Guides: English: J. Lyons

This guide includes print and online resources for English: Courses include: English Literature, Communication, Expository Writing, Creative Writing, Journalism, Humanities, Reading, etc.

Embedding and Blending Quotations and MLA Format

English I

Embedding/Blending Quotations and MLA Citations (updated for short class, 20-21)

Information Literacy Topics:

 - Creating/Writing a research-based product

- In-text citations

- Using technology tools

Objective: To understand how to effectively embed/blend quotations into writing in order to cite evidence (direct quotes) using MLA citation style.

Learning Expectations:

- Academic-Writing: “Students will produce and distribute a variety of writing designed to entertain, inform, or argue, as well build and present knowledge derived from research.“

- Civic: “Students will exhibit personal integrity and ethical decision-making.”

1. Go to Nearpod.com.  Join class with class code, under “Students.”

2.  Enter your first and last name click “Join session.”

3. Follow the slideshow

4. Why use quotations?

Your goal when you analyze literature:

- Develop an argument.

- Use quotations.

- Choose and discuss material from the text.

- Don’t over-quote.

5. Using quotations to support an argument

Which argument is supported by this quotation?

 “Maybe the two different worlds we lived in weren’t so different. We saw the same sunset” (Hinton 41).

Consider this method of literary analysis.

- Focus your reading on the main points about the characters, or their world.

- Copy down quotes that seem particularly important.

- Draw conclusions about what those quotes show.

- State your conclusions, using relevant quotations for support.

- Develop your arguments in detail, with examples.

6. Embedding/Blending Quotations

Always EMBED/BLEND quotations into your text.

NEVER just “plop” a quotation in your writing!

In other words, don’t let a quotation stand alone as its own sentence (unless it’s multiple sentences long).

Don’t OVERquote.Too many quotations in the writing is not “good” writing either.  The bulk of your essay should be YOUR WORDS.

Blend your quote using SIGNAL WORDS:

A clause or phrase to introduce a quote, paraphrase, or summary. 

Signal words

acknowledge

comment

endorse

reason

add

compare

grant

refute

admit

imply

reject

agree

contend

insist

report

argue

declare

illustrate

respond

assert

deny

note

suggest

believe

dispute

claim

emphasize

write

think

observe

7. MLA Format

What is a “citation style?”

“Citation styles...”

- Are rules written by academic organizations (APA/MLA/Chicago).

- Describe exactly how to show where information came from.

- Use “In-text” citations (APA and MLA), OR

- Use “footnotes” (Chigaco).

- Are also rules for formatting font, spacing, titles, page numbers, graphs, tables, etc., etc., etc.

Basic rules for formatting an MLA paper

- 12-point Times New Roman or Arial font

- Double-spaced.

- Last name and page number, upper RIGHT-hand each page.

- Top left side of page:

- Name

- Teacher’s Name

- Course Title (period, or other info: ask your teacher)

- Date: 26 October 2020 (no commas)

- Title of essay/paper--do not put in bold or italics (unless the title of a book is in the title of your essay/paper)

Make your own copy of the MLA template.

8. Homework:

Complete this assignment in your Google Classroom.

Harper Lee, the author of To Kill a Mockingbird, gives a vivid description of Boo Radley’s brother, Mr. Radley, who came back to take care of the house and his brother.

Your job is to make a point about what the author is illustrating about this character with the words she writes, and to use a quote to support that point.  You will write a single sentence. 

Here are some hints about how to do this.

- Decide what the author wants to show, and state it.

- Choose the most relevant part of the excerpt below to quote.

- Write a single sentence that smoothly blends the part of the quote you want to use with the point you want to mak

- Use one of the SIGNAL WORDS (see list).

- Use quotation marks, and/or ellipses (the 2 dots) if you cut off part of a quoted sentence.

- Include the author and page citation either at the end of the sentence, or just the page number if you use the author’s name (Lee) as part of your statement.

- Go!

Quote from page 12 of Harper Lee’s book, To Kill a Mockingbird

“But every day Jem and I would see Mr. Radley walking to and from town. He was a thin leathery man with colorless eyes, so colorless they did not reflect light. His cheekbones were sharp and his mouth was wide, with a thin upper lip and a full lower lip.”

 

MLA Format Resources:

- OWL Purdue Sample MLA paper

- AHS Librarians Citation Format Examples

- To Kill a Mockingbird Sample Paper

- Mrs. Hulse’s paper with correct and incorrect examples

Lyons: eBooks with BookCreator

Creative Writing (English)

Using BookCreator  (updated 4-2020)

Information literacy topics:

- Using technology tools

 

Objective: To effectively use the BookCreator platform to create an online eBook that takes advantage of the full possible range media contect to present a narrative (children’s book).

 

Learning Expectations: 

Academic-Writing: “Students will produce and distribute a variety of writing designed to entertain, inform, or argue, as well build and present knowledge derived from research.“

Academic-Problem-solving: “Students will use appropriate tools strategically to solve problems.”

 

1. Discussion:

We are going to discover how to use the BookCreator platform together as you begin to produce your eBooks.

 

Look at these examples:

Girls Don't Play Basketball by Leah Ray

Graphic novel-style (narration included, no video)

 

The Magical Moustache by Mrs. Goodwin's 2nd Grade Class

Graphic novel-style (limited voice-over, some video, some sound effects)

 

2. Getting started

- Go to BookCreator.com

- Sign in as a STUDENT

- In “LIBRARIES”, go to “Join a Library”. Use the join code below:

5J5CHFN

- Use the to start your book.
 

3. Add your text, images, and sound. (Hint: Write and refine all your text first in a Google doc so you don’t lose it.)

 

4. Learn how to do more by following:

- A short video from your librarians.

- These really good written  instructions from BookCreator.

 

5. Teachers should follow these instructions to sign up, and speak to the librarians to get their own class library.

Embedding Quotations

English I

Embedding/Blending Quotations and MLA Citations (updated 9-2019)

Information Literacy Topics:

  • Creating/Writing a research-based product
  • In-text citations
  • Using technology tools

Objective: To understand how to effectively embed/blend quotations into writing, to cite evidence (direct quotes) using MLA citation style.

Learning Expectations: 

  • Academic-Writing: “Students will produce and distribute a variety of writing designed to entertain, inform, or argue, as well build and present knowledge derived from research.“
  • Civic: “Students will exhibit personal integrity and ethical decision-making.”

During class:

Objective: To understand how to effectively embed/blend quotations into literary analysis, to use MLA style 8 in formal essays and papers.

 

1. Go to Nearpod.com.  Enter class code.

 

2.  Type your first name and click join session.

3. Today's slideshow will appear on your screen.  Follow along!

Creating Citations in NoodleTools

Writers Freshman Bootcamp

NoodleTools Citations and Notes (updated 9-2019)

Information literacy topics:

- Taking notes

- Organizing source citations

- References

- Using technology tools

 

Objective: To use a web citation generator (NoodleTools) to create citations and bibliographic references. 

 

Learning Expectations: Academic-Writing: “Students will produce and distribute a variety of writing designed to entertain, inform, or argue, as well build and present knowledge derived from research.“

 

1. Discuss objective.

 

2. Sign into your NoodleTools account:

- If you have signed on to NoodleTools during the 2018-19 year:

- Sign in Google Drive first and find the NoodleTool app logo under the

 

- or log on to NoodleTools, using your @amityschools.org Google sign-on. 

 

- If you are new to the district, or did not sign on to NoodleTools in 2018-19

- Follow these instructions to create a NoodleTools account.

 

3. Student Practice: create a project to begin citations.

Create a project to begin citations.

3.a. Click on “New Project”.

 

3.b. Enter a “Project Title”.

3.c. Choose “MLA” style (for this English class), and click the “Advanced” citation level for full functionality. Click “Submit”.

 

3.d. Write a “Research Question” (think of something related to your topic).

3.e. Write a “Thesis” statement. This is the statement or question you will prove or discuss.

3.f. Click the “Projects” tab to view your project list.

 

3.g. Click on the name of your project to open it.

 

3.h. Click on the “Sources” tab. You are now ready to cite a source.

 

4. Student practice: creating a MANUAL citation for a video found on the web.

Create a MANUAL citation for a video found on the web.  

4.a. Go to this video found on the Critical Media Project website

4.b. First, notice that the video is actually NOT from that site, but really from a DIFFERENT site.  Go to the real site where it originates from.

4.c. Return to NoodleTools, and click on “Create a New Citation”.

 

4.d. Answer the question “Where is it?”. Note that the choice here refers to WHERE the source was found, not what KIND of source it is. Choose “Web Site”.

4.e. Answer the question “WHAT is it?”.Choose “Video Clip (Online)”.

4.f. Start filling in as much information as you can, copying from the article, and adjusting the text as needed. Notice the pop-up hints.

- URL: find it

- Date of publication: find it

- Most recent date of access [ today?]:

- Title of video clip: find it

- Click "Archival video (not user-contributed)", because this is not a site where users can upload videos.

- Name of the site: the name of the specific site (hint, it is one of several radio stations)

- Publisher of the site: (often is the copyright holder at the bottom of the page)

- Contributors/Role: The author of the written article is also the producer, because her name appears at the end of the video (here called "contributor").

4.g. Click “SAVE”.

Compare your finished citation to this sample...

 

Hsu, Jennifer. "Being 12: 'People Think I'm Supposed to Talk Ghetto, Whatever That Is.'" WNYC, New York Public Radio, 8 July 2015, www.wnyc.org/story/people-sometimes-think-im-supposed-talk-ghetto-whatever-kids-race. Accessed 24 Sept. 2019. 

 

5. Student practice: Create a MANUAL citation for a web source.

Create a MANUAL citation for a web source.

5.a. Go to the web blog post titled “"Growing Up Rich: How it Shapes Identity", from the HuffPost Contributor blog. 

5.b. Back in NoodleTools, from the Sources tab, click on “Create a New Citation”.

5.c. Answer the question “Where is it?”. Once again choose “Web Site”.

5.d. Answer the question “WHAT is it?”. Choose “Web page” because this is the most accurate of all the choices given.

5.e. Under the drop-down, change “Web site” to “Blog”.

5.f.Start filling in as much information as you can, copying from the article:

- URL: find it

- Date of post: use the most recent revision

- Most recent date of access [ today? ]: find it

- Citing a post (Check this)

- Authors: (fill in all available information)

- Title of post: find it

- Name of the blog: Find it

- Publisher of the blog: Find it (often the person or entity that has the copyright at the bottom of the page)

5.g. Click “Submit”.

 

Compare your finished citation to this sample:

 

Dayton, Tian. "Growing Up Rich: How it Shapes Identity." HuffPost, HuffPost Wellness, 17 Nov. 2011, www.huffpost.com/entry/growing-up-rich-how-it-sh_b_109076?guccounter=1&guce_referrer=aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cuZ29vZ2xlLmNvbS8&guce_referrer_sig=AQAAAD2T-3RjuAtCZp8CR2Wi-bkkT3KUxO-kUElrnh0D8XySHEkIp747-ycFnHQEgKbemiU-WM-1dGG46xBvcwxg-mzIzz5EWSR2Fpb_vRcdGfrChcLZPJTYx0iC22JsVtlWIj64xsoy3FWoAxkNF7ttVYfhCBOmyvZEZNPIhKKsze2h. Accessed 23 Sept. 2019. 

 

Citing your sources within your paper

- How do you cite the article in the body of your paper?

- After the quotation, fact, opinion, or idea that you use in your paper, place your "in-text" citation to credit that source.  Put it at the end of the sentence, before the punctuation mark. 

- The citation is usually the author's last name, followed by a page number (both in parenthesis).

- If you use the author's name in the sentence, then the citation is just the page number (in parenthesis).

- If there is no author, use the first few words of whatever the citation starts with in the "Works Cited" list, with a page number, if there is one.

- If the first few words are of an article, put them in quotes.

Notice:

- In-text citations used for the 1st time.

- In-text citation used 2nd or more times consecutively.

- In-text citation used 2nd time, but not in a row.

- Works Cited list at the end.

- Look at the sample page from Purdue University’s writing site.

- You will need to follow the instructions and examples from a reliable source, like the writing experts at Purdue University’s OWL MLA style pages.

-You can also look at the Amity Librarians’ MLA Quick Guide, with examples from the most common kinds of formats.

 

How do you organize the Works Cited page?  

- The "Works Cited" page goes at the end of the document. Give it the title, "Works Cited".

- Put citations in alphabetical order of author. If there is no author, put citations in order of the first work of the citation.

Children's Literature Analysis

Creative Writing

Children’s Books: Evaluation/Analysis

Objectives: To understand the creative process and elements included in successful picture books.To discuss and understand current trends in children’s literature.  Analysis and evaluation of picture book composition.

Google Amity Library, select first resultFind Online StuffBy SubjectEnglishClass ProjectsChevan

1. Initiation - Discussion: What is your favorite children’s book or What is a memorable book from your childhood?  Why?

 

2. Read Aloud: Where the Wild Things are by Maurice Sendak, 1963.

 

3. Discussion of book--using analysis worksheet as a guide for the discussion.

    Additional questions: What about the book is engaging to children?

Would you consider this to be a controversial book?

 

4. Transition to activity: You will be rotating through stations and reviewing children’s books. The books at each station share a commonality and with your group, you’ll need to determine what that is. Review the books--you won’t need to read them in their entirety. Skim, make observations. Pay attention to the following: themes, lessons, topics, authors, etc. You will have three minutes at each station. Jot down a few notes on the graphic organizer. We will discuss your findings when we reconvene.

 

5. Share out: What commonalities did you notice at the stations?

 

6. Group project introduction: Now that you’ve viewed many picture books, you need to choose one book with your group to read aloud and analyze. There’s additional books as well that were not included in the stations so feel free to look at those. If there’s a book your group would like to analyze and it isn’t here, please let Mrs. Hulse or Mr. Musco know. We may have it in our library.

Paraphrasing

English I

Paraphrasing Mini Lesson (1-2018, V. Hulse)

Information literacy topics covered

1. Explain objective: To understand what paraphrasing is, explain the importance of this skill, recognize what paraphrasing is and how this skill helps you avoid plagiarizing information and ideas. Take notes by paraphrasing what you read.

 

2. Paraphrasing--What is it?  View slideshow. Show video.

 

3. Practice: Students practice paraphrasing using a gradual release model (I do, we do, you do)  

Hand out worksheet to students

  • Ask students to read example 1 silently.
  • I DO: Using “think aloud” method, demonstrate how to paraphrase example 1.

Re-read one sentence at a time and put in own words

Have students write the paraphrase on back side of paper with you.

  • Ask students to read example 2.
  • WE DO:  With volunteers from class, go sentence by sentence and paraphrase example 2 as a class.
  • Ask students to read example 3.
  • YOU DO: Ask students to paraphrase example 3 independently.  Fill out response on google form. Share responses via google sheets.
  • Discuss how the practice went--(strengths, challenges)

4. Wrap Up Discussion: How will paraphrasing help you with taking notes?  

To Start

Open Google Chrome

Google Search: “Amity Library”, go to library page

New tab: Sign onto Google Drive

New Tab: Sign onto NEARPOD.COM

Amity High School, Amity Region 5 School District, Woodbridge, CT 06525, 203-397-4844 Librarians: Robert F. Musco and Victoria Hulse Copyright 2017