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AHS Subject Guides: English: E. Clark

This guide includes print and online resources for English: Courses include: English Literature, Communication, Expository Writing, Creative Writing, Journalism, Humanities, Reading, etc.

Introduction to Research Resources

E. Clark 

Career and College Writing (Nov. 2020, V. Hulse)

Introduction to Research Resources

  • Information literacy topics:
  • Using databases
  • Searching strategies for information
  • Using technology tools

Objective: To learn to access appropriate print and online research sources and to practice effective searching strategies.

 

Learning Expectations:

Academic-Writing: Students will produce and distribute a variety of writing designed to entertain, inform, or argue, as well build and present knowledge derived from research.

Academic-Problem-solving: Students will use appropriate tools strategically to solve problems.

 

1. Access activity guide online at:

Google Amity library, navigate to websiteFind Online StuffBy SubjectEnglishClass ProjectsE.ClarkIntroduction to Research Resources             

2. Sources requirements for research paper

--Discussion--What does it mean to use a variety and wide range of resources 

when writing a research paper?  

3. Using Amity’s library card catalog to obtain a print source.

--Go to Amity Library’s website, on left hand side of screen click where it says

“Library Catalog.”

--In search box type your keywords in.  Note--you may have to adjust your key terms.”  

--Verify that the book is indeed in the library.  See right side of screen.

 

 

--Books may be checked out. If you need assistance locating materials, please 

ask.  

4. Discussion: What is a database?  How does it differ from a web search?  Why should you use them?  

--Watch video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lDlEpt0AdKc

--Show infographic: Reasons to use databases

Types of online databases discussed today

School product databases

  • Include articles from many different kinds of publications, including proprietary materials.
  • May include e-books, encyclopedias, etc. 
  • Include lots of easy access tools, may have overviews on topics (a little like a textbook)
  • Usually divided in subject areas
  • Offer multiple ways to browse or search
  • Examples:
  • SIRS  

Scholarly databases

  • Most often used at college level.
  • May include e-books, encyclopedias, periodicals (journals, magazines, etc.).
  • Offer multiple ways to browse or search, but are less concerned with being attractive than school product databases. 
  • Information is usually NOT organized in topics; you have to search.
  • Example:
  • Academic Search Complete

5. Discussion: School Product Database: 

Picture SIRS

6. Discussion:  Presentation of a Scholarly database:

Academic Search Complete  

7. Creating citations

8. Questions?

Introduction to Noodletools/Annotated Bibliographies

E. Clark (updated 11-2020 V. Hulse)

Introduction to Citations and Writing an Annotated Bibliography


1. Discussion: Creating an Annotated Bibliography

  • What is an annotated bibliography?
    • An annotated bibliography is a list of sources, arranged like a bibliography, in which each source has explanatory text after it, usually limited to a maximum of 150 words. Look at this sample from OWL Purdue.
  • The annotations included with each source may follow the format listed below:  
    • Summary: A summary includes information regarding what the source is mostly about.
    • Assessment: Who wrote the source, credentials of author, and determine if the source is biased or objective.  
    • Reflection: The source’s usefulness has been explored and explained how it will fit into your research.
  • To write your annotation in Noodletools, insert your annotation under the dropdown on the right under “Options”

:

                    OR

 

  • After you cite your source, click save and add annotation.   

  • Type your annotation into the box and press save and close when you are done.

 

  • Once you have finished all of your citations and annotations, export your Annotated Bibliography to Word or Google Docs

  • After you exported the document, follow Mrs. Clark's instructions regarding how it should be formatted. Noodletools will format the annotation differently than what Mrs. Clark requires.

ELA Independent Reading: Finding a Book to Read

ELA Independent Reading

Find a Book in the Amity HS Library

Do you want to find a book in the Amity High School Library for a research project, or just to read for fun? Before you come in to browse our shelves, watch this video on how to search the library catalog, 

How to Find a Book in the Library Catalog: Introduction to Destiny

Next, get your book.

  • Find a book in the catalog or come in to browse.
  • Check it out with us.
  • Return it on to the library on time, OR...
  • Need more time? You MUST email Mr. Musco or Mrs. Hulse to avoid fines.

eBooks and audioBooks:

Currently digital books are available from two sources starting at the library database page:

  • eBooks from EBSCO eBooks
  • eBooks and AudioBooks from Public Libraries with SORA 

 

Get Book Recommendations

How to Find Book Recommendations Online: Book Recommendation Websites 

YALSA Booklists: compiled by the American Association of School Libraries.

School Library Journal: Check under the tabs for Awards and Books to search

RJ Julia Independent Book Sellers: Staff recommendations for teens

Common Sense Media Teen Booklists: There are several different broad categories.

GoodReads Teen Booklists: A great little summary, plus tons of reader reviews.

Barnes and Noble for Teens: Take a look at the “Teens” list to see what’s hot.

You can always just Google “lists of books for teens”.

Paraphrasing

Paraphrasing Mini Lesson (2-2020 V. Hulse)

Information literacy topics covered

  • Definition of paraphrasing
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.2-Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
  • Understand the importance of paraphrasing  
  • Model and practice skill of paraphrasing through effective note-taking

1. Objective: To understand what paraphrasing is, explain the importance of this skill, recognize what paraphrasing is and how this skill helps you avoid plagiarizing information and ideas, take notes by paraphrasing what you read, and citing paraphrased ideas.

 

2. Paraphrasing--What is it?  Show video.

 

3. Practice: Practice paraphrasing using a gradual release model (I do, we do, you do)  

Worksheet to students

  • Read example 1 silently.
    • I DO: Using “think aloud” method, the teacher will demonstrate how to paraphrase example 1.
    • Re-read one sentence at a time and put in own words.
    • Students write down paraphrase as modeled by teacher.
  • Read example 2 silently
    • WE DO: With volunteers from class, go sentence by sentence and paraphrase example 2 together. Students write down paraphrased text.
  • Read example 3.
    • YOU DO: Paraphrase example 3 independently.  Share responses.
  • Discussion: How did it go? (strengths, challenges)

4. Wrap Up Discussion: How will paraphrasing help you with taking notes?  

Embedding/Blending Quotations and MLA Format

Student Instructions

English I

Embedding/Blending Quotations and MLA Citations (updated 9-2019)

Information Literacy Topics:

  • Creating/Writing a research-based product
  • In-text citations
  • Using technology tools

Objective: To understand how to effectively embed/blend quotations into writing, to cite evidence (direct quotes) using MLA citation style.

 

Learning Expectations: 

  • Academic-Writing: “Students will produce and distribute a variety of writing designed to entertain, inform, or argue, as well build and present knowledge derived from research.“
  • Civic: “Students will exhibit personal integrity and ethical decision-making.”

During class:

Objective: To understand how to effectively embed/blend quotations into literary analysis, to use MLA style 8 in formal essays and papers.

1.Go to Nearpod.com.  Enter class code

 

2.  Type your first name and click join session.

3. Today's slideshow will appear on your screen.  Follow along!

Part II: MLA Citation Style-title page

1. Rules

Rules for MLA formatting rules for writing papers/essays.

  • 12 point Times New Roman/Arial font.
  • Double spaced
  • Last name and page number in right upper corner of EACH page.  (Open a blank google doc and show students how to insert a header.  Directions: From the “Insert” menu click on “Header & page number” select “Page number” and select the option that shows a page number on pages 1 and 2.  The page function will automatically number the pages for you. Place your space bar before the number 1 and type in your last name, followed by a single space.  Click outside of the Header box to return to the main document.)
  • Format for top of first page: review with students.  Emphasize the date format.
  • Titles of papers/essays should not be italicized or in bold (unless the title of your book appears in your title--then italicize that only.)

2. Sample papers

Take a look at the sample papers: OWL Sample MLA Paper and To Kill a Mockingbird Sample Paper

      

3. Review Mrs. Hulse’s sample paper

    What's wrong with Mrs. Hulse's sample paper?

 

4. Today's class: Respond using Nearpod to the following question: “What’s one thing you learned from today’s class?

5. Create a template following the MLA citation guidelines.

Judging the Reliability of Information from Online News Media

Journalism

How to Judge the Reliability of Information from Online News Media

(updated R. Musco 4-2018)

Information literacy topics:

  • Determining best sources

  • Evaluating sources

 

Objective: To apply reasonable and flexible criteria that allow you to judge the reliability of information from online news media, in a moment in which the accuracy of media information has been questioned.

 

1. Presentation:

Discuss objective, and timeliness of activity, since the accuracy of media information has come into question in popular culture.

 

2. Individual Reading (5 minutes):

Read (in silence) the first 10 short paragraphs of this article about a lawsuit against President Trump.     

Reading #1

Foreign Payments to Trump Firms Violate Constitution, Suit Will Claim

 

As you read, focus on the following aspects:

  • The “nature” of the material. WHAT is it?

  • The origin of the material. WHERE did you find it?

  • The people involved as writers, reporters, sources, etc. WHO are they?

  • The characteristics of the writing. WHAT is it like?

  • The purpose of the article. What is the author’s intent? WHY was it written?

 

3. Pairwork (5 minutes):

With a partner, use all the information you can find on this page to describe the reporting for this article. Make sure each person TAKES NOTES on each aspect above.

 

4. Discussion  (15 minutes)

Group discussion:

  • The “nature” of the material. What is it?

    • Discuss the WHAT it is.

  • The origin of the material. WHERE did you find it?

    • Discuss the WHERE it is on the web, the web site “About”.)

  • The people involved (all).

    • Discuss the WHO: Author?, contributors?, sources?,

  • The characteristics of the writing.

    • Discuss the WHAT it is like: quality, use of sources, arguments made, etc.

  • The purpose of the article. What is the author’s intention?

    • Discuss WHY it was written: point of view, bias, etc.


5. Individual Reading (5 minutes):

Read (in silence) the first 5 paragraphs of this article about the same lawsuit against President Trump.

Reading #2

ETHICS GROUP BRINGS BOGUS CONSTITUTIONAL SUIT AGAINST PRESIDENT TRUMP

 

As you read, focus on the following aspects:

  • The “nature” of the material. WHAT is it?

  • The origin of the material. WHERE did you find it?

  • The people involved as writers, reporters, sources, etc. WHO are they?

  • The characteristics of the writing. WHAT is it like?

  • The purpose of the article. What is the author’s intent? WHY was it written?

 

6. Pairwork: With a partner, do the exact same thing you did for the Times article (5 minutes). Make sure you each take notes. For each aspect.

 

7. Discuss results as a group (15 minutes)

  • The “nature” of the material. WHAT is it?

    • Discuss the WHAT it is.

  • The origin of the material. WHERE did you find it?

    • Discuss the WHERE it is on the web, the web site “About”.)

  • The people involved (all).

    • Discuss the WHO: Author?, contributors?, sources?,

  • The characteristics of the writing.

    • Discuss the WHAT it is like: quality, use of sources, arguments made, etc.

  • The purpose of the article. What is the author’s intention?

    • Discuss WHY it was written: point of view, bias, etc.

 

8. Wrap-up and Conclusions:

Review criteria for analysis, main points.

All Quiet on the Western Front

 

All Quiet On The Western Front

 

A number of books have been reserved on the topics and placed on a cart.  See the resource list here.

ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT
Visual Presentation on World War I - See topics list HERE

Tweeting Through The Ages

 

Clark Lesson here.

 

Journalism - "Tweeting" Through the Ages

Introduction to Research Resources

Expository Writing

Introduction to Research Resources

  • Information literacy topics:
  • Using databases
  • Searching strategies for information
  • Using technology tools

Objective: To learn to access appropriate print and online research sources and to practice effective searching strategies.

1. Access activity guide online at:

Google Amity library, navigate to websiteFind Online StuffBy SubjectEnglishClass ProjectsE.ClarkIntroduction to Research Resources             

 

2. Sources requirements for research paper

--Discussion--What does it mean to use a variety and wide range of resources

when writing a research paper?  

 

3. Using Amity’s library card catalog to obtain a print source.

--Go to Amity Library’s website, on left hand side of screen click where it says

“Library Catalog.”

--In search box type your keywords in.  Note--you may have to adjust your key terms.”  

--Verify that the book is indeed in the library.  See right side of screen.

 

--Books may be checked out. If you need assistance locating materials, please

ask.  

 

4. Discussion: What is a database?  How does it differ from a web search?  Why should you use them?

--Watch video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lDlEpt0AdKc

--Show infographic: Reasons to use databases

 

Types of online databases discussed today

--School product databases

  • Include articles from many different kinds of publications, including proprietary materials.
  • May include e-books, encyclopedias, etc.
  • Include lots of easy access tools, may have overviews on topics (a little like a textbook)
  • Usually divided in subject areas
  • Offer multiple ways to browse or search
  • Examples: SIRS

--Scholarly databases

  • Most often used at college level.
  • May include e-books, encyclopedias, periodicals (journals, magazines, etc.).
  • Offer multiple ways to browse or search, but are less concerned with being attractive than school product databases.
  • Information is usually NOT organized in topics; you have to search.
  • Example: Academic Search Complete

5. Discussion: School Product Database:

Picture SIRS

 

6. Discussion:  Presentation of a Scholarly database: Academic Search Complete  

7. What does it mean to "use a source" for a research paper?

 

8. Tips for reading scholarly articles: Sample article

  • Read the abstract before you even look at the full text.
  • Review table of contents, if any.  Focus on pertinent pages.
  • Read the conclusion!
  • Ultimately, you don’t always have to read the ENTIRE article.

9. Closure--Discussion: What does it mean to conduct research?

Finding Sources and Research

E. Clark

English I

 

 

Objective: To understand the characteristics of available reliable print and online sources for research, concentrating on encyclopedic/reference works and popular, websites, and to practice searching these sources. 

Information literacy topics:

  • Determining best sources

  • Searching strategies for information

  • Using technology tools

Amity website→High SchoolAHS Library Information Center

Find Online Stuff→By Subject→English→Class Projects →Clark

 

 

Search our library catalogs from Destiny Quest to find all our printed books, magazines and journals, textbooks, encyclopedias, music CDs, movies (DVD and VHS).

 

School Product Database Sites:

  1. ABC Clio : American Government

    *comprehensive electronic library of historical reference materials
  2. SIRS,

    *mix of periodicals
  3. History Reference Center

    *full text for more than 1,990 reference books, encyclopedias, non-fiction books, and academic journals
  4.  American History in Video

    *online video allowing students and researchers to analyze events in America's history, and their presentation over time through different media

 

 

Debate Skills

Here’s how it all comes together:

  1. Research problems that need to be solved, to organize your ideas and research on both the causes and solutions to that problem into coherent cases. Deliver your case effectively and to defend them against criticism.

  2. Use moral philosophies to solve ethical questions.

  3. Read laws carefully and to decide what happens when government interests collide with individual rights. Use your analysis of the importance of a state/government interest against the competing civil liberty (or vice versa, the civil liberty against the government interest) to justify your resolution.

Debate

  • 1st Affirmative - 2min
  • Cross Ex - 2 min
  • 1st Negative - 2min
  • Cross Ex - 2 min
  • 2nd Affirmative - 2min
  • Cross Ex - 2min
  • 2nd Negative - 2min
  • Cross Ex - 2 min
  • 1st Negative Rebuttal - 2 min
  • 1st Affirmative Rebuttal - 2 min
  • 2nd Negative Rebuttal - 2 min
  • 2nd Affirmative Rebuttal - 2 min
  • Preparation Time – 5 min beginning

 

  • TOTAL TIME: 29 minutes

To Start

Open Google Chrome

Google Search: “Amity Library”, go to library page

New tab: Sign onto Google Drive

New Tab: Sign onto NEARPOD.COM

Amity High School, Amity Region 5 School District, Woodbridge, CT 06525, 203-397-4844 Librarians: Robert F. Musco and Victoria Hulse Copyright 2017