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AHS Subject Guides: English: K. Clark

This guide includes print and online resources for English: Courses include: English Literature, Communication, Expository Writing, Creative Writing, Journalism, Humanities, Reading, etc.

ELA Independent Reading: Finding a Book to Read

ELA Independent Reading

Find a Book in the Amity HS Library

Do you want to find a book in the Amity High School Library for a research project, or just to read for fun? Before you come in to browse our shelves, watch this video on how to search the library catalog, 

How to Find a Book in the Library Catalog: Introduction to Destiny

Next, get your book.

  • Find a book in the catalog or come in to browse.
  • Check it out with us.
  • Return it on to the library on time, OR...
  • Need more time? You MUST email Mr. Musco or Mrs. Hulse to avoid fines.

eBooks and audioBooks:

Currently digital books are available from two sources starting at the library database page:

  • eBooks from EBSCO eBooks
  • eBooks and AudioBooks from Public Libraries with SORA 

 

Get Book Recommendations

How to Find Book Recommendations Online: Book Recommendation Websites 

YALSA Booklists: compiled by the American Association of School Libraries.

School Library Journal: Check under the tabs for Awards and Books to search

RJ Julia Independent Book Sellers: Staff recommendations for teens

Common Sense Media Teen Booklists: There are several different broad categories.

GoodReads Teen Booklists: A great little summary, plus tons of reader reviews.

Barnes and Noble for Teens: Take a look at the “Teens” list to see what’s hot.

You can always just Google “lists of books for teens”.

How to Record a TED-Talk

Clark, K. How to record a Ted-talk 2020-21

English II

How to Record a Ted-talk (updated 3-2021)

Information literacy topics:

- Using technology tools

 

Objective: To explore two potential technologies for recording “TED Talk-like” presentations using Macs and PCs. 

 

Standards:

Amity Learning Expectations

Academic

- Students will speak and listen effectively in order to comprehend ideas and information, collaborate, and present knowledge and ideas to a variety of audiences.

- Students will use appropriate tools strategically to solve problems.

 

ISTE Standards for Students

Creative Communicator

- Students choose the appropriate platforms and tools for meeting the desired objections of their creation or communication.

- Students communicate complex ideas clearly and effectively by creating or using a variety of digital objects such as visualizations, models, or simulations.

- Students publish or present content that customizes the message and medium for their intended audiences.

 

1. Introduction

This session is intended to give a brief overview of just two of many possible ways to record a “TED Talk-like” presentation using a school or home computer. 

Important points:

- You choose: 

There are MANY ways to record yourself (phone, real camera, iPad, etc.). You are free to use the technology you want. We are only offering two ways.

- Sit or Stand? 

Real TED Talks involve a presenter standing on and moving about a stage.  We think that standing and gesturing as you speak is much more effective than a seated talking head.

- Polished product: 

Your finished product must be clean and polished, so you should plan on recording it several times until it is right.

- Visual appeal: 

You should plan your lighting and background, and make sure there are no distracting noises. A backyard or a bathroom might both be perfect, as long as the lighting is even and adequate, and the background looks good.

- Include an image…

You should include some relevant image to support and enhance your presentation. You can either create it digitally, in which case you will have to splice it into your recording, or you can print it and show it while you talk.

- Editing not required, BUT…

You do not HAVE to get involved in editing your recording, but it is easier to do something with a few awkward moments, and edit them out, then to do something perfect.

 

2. Method MAC

- Plan: Research, practice, and PLAN your recording, then REHEARSE, and record/re-record.

- Record: Use Quicktime with your built-in camera

- Add image: Print and hold your image, OR make a separate screen recording of your image while you talk.

- Edit: Use Quicktime, then iMovie.

Trim unwanted seconds from the beginning and end of your recordings when you finish recording in Quicktime.

Export from Quicktime.

Import into iMovie to edit and/or save (export in MP4 format).

Cut out unwanted pieces, (and splice in screen recording of image, if needed).

Save and export (export in MP4 format).

- Post: Follow your teachers’ directions about how and where to turn-in or post your work.

Resources:

- How to edit in iMovie

- Sample TED-talk in MAC

 

3. Method PC (school laptop)

- Plan: Research, practice, and PLAN your recording, then REHEARSE, and record/re-record.

- Record: Use Screencastify with your built-in camera

- Add image: Print and hold your image, OR make a separate screen recording of your image while you talk.

- Edit: Use Screencastify.

Trim unwanted seconds from the beginning and end of your recordings in the first screen that appears when you finish recording in Screencastify.

Use the advanced editor “Open in Editor” to cut out unwanted pieces. 

Use the “+ Add media” function to splice in your screen recording of the image, if needed.

Export to Drive, or export and download in MP4 format.

- Post: Follow your teachers’ directions about how and where to turn-in or post your work.

Resources:

- How to use Screencastify (for Screencastify newbies)

- How to edit in ScreenCastify

- Sample TED-talk in PC

Intro to Citations and Creating an Annotated Bibliography

English II

Introduction to Citations and Creating an Annotated Bibliography (updated 2-2021)

Information literacy topics:

- Taking notes

- Organizing source citations

- References

- Using technology tools

 

Objective: To understand and define the concept of a research “citation”, and to use a web citation generator (NoodleTools) to create citations and an annotated bibliography.

 

1: Find the activities for this class, at:

Google SearchAmity Library

(tab) Find Online StuffBy SubjectEnglish

(tab) ClassesK. Clark

 

Part A: Understanding and Creating Citations

 

2. Discussion: Students brainstorm the answer to the question: “What is a citation?”

(A citation is all the information you need to tell where an idea or quotation came from, and to be able to find that source again.)

 

3. Discussion: “What kind of information goes into a citation?” 

Provide students with “NoodleTools Tutorial Introduction” to watch on their own, if further clarification is needed. Start at 00:41 sec

The video discusses:

- Definition of a citation

- Important information in a citation

- author

- title

- place it can be found (database, book collection, etc.)

- publisher

- city of publication

- date of publication

- medium (type of publication), like Print, Web, File, Film, CD-ROM, DVD, etc.

- date you found it (electronic resources)

- web address (URL) or permanent web identifier (d.o.i.)

Note: the medium (type) of publication may be: Print, Web, File, Film, CD-ROM, DVD, etc. and more, depending on the kind of information

- Reasons for citing sources

- Best software for citations

 

4. Discussion: Analyze sample citation to see which elements it includes. 

What kind of source is it?” 

“Identify each information element of the citation.”

 

Robinson, Eugene. "Voter Fraud is Not the Problem." Washington Post, 25 Sep 2012, p. A.19. SIRS Issues Researcher, http://sks.sirs.com. Accessed 11 Feb. 2017.

   

5. A few tips and tricks:

  • Print resources (books) are print/in-hand and look for book in the options. 
  • Book citations will be relatively short, but it’s important to include the following information: author, title of book, publisher, publication city, and copyright date.
  • ABC Clio is a database and the information is considered “Original Content”.
  • Pay careful attention to what type of material you are citing from a database. The answer is always provided--you just need to know where to look.

Part B: Creating an Annotated Bibliography

 

6.  Discussion: Creating an Annotated Bibliography

What is an annotated bibliography?

 

An annotated bibliography is a list of sources, arranged like a works cited/bibliography, in which each source has explanatory text after it. Look at this sample from OWL Purdue.  

 

           The annotations included with each source will generally follow this format:     

 

-Summary: 

A summary includes an overview explaining what it is about.  

 

-Assessment: 

An assessment should be your judgement on the reliability of the source’s author/organization (credentials, expertise, trustworthy, etc.).  Is this an academic resource or something else? Consider this question--How do you know this is a reliable/credible source?

 

-Reflection: 

A reflection should discuss in what way is the source relevant and how the source can be used to cite evidence that supports your research. 

 

- To create your annotation, type the information in the box below the citation fields. 

 

                                                              

Sample of Annotated Bibliography:

This article questions whether schools could serve a larger role in preventing incidents like the Rodney King riots from occurring again. It brings up the idea that educational institutions could help develop positive relationships/interactions for students of diverse backgrounds. Dr. Donna M. Davis, a Professor in the School of Education at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, has over 30 years experience in education. She taught high school English for 10 years before earning her doctorate at the University of Kansas. Dr. Davis teaches courses in the history and philosophy of education at UMKC and has been published in numerous scholarly journals in the areas of urban education, multicultural education, philosophy of education, history of education, arts education, and social justice. The portion of the article pertinent to my research is how there was a significant decrease in African American students enrolled in the Los Angeles school district following the Rodney King riots. 

 

7. Log onto Noodletools via the apps in your Google Drive. 

  • Click
  • Scroll down until you see Noodletools.
  • If you haven’t logged onto Noodletools this year, you may have to update your profile.

 

8. Create a project to begin citations.

8.a. Click on “New Project”.

 

8.b. Enter a “Project Title”.

8.c. Choose “MLA” style (for this class), and click the “Advanced” citation level for full functionality. Click “Submit”.

 

8.d. Write a “Research Question” (think of something related to your topic).

 

8.e. Write a “Thesis” statement. This is the statement or question you will prove or discuss.

8.f. Click the “Projects” tab to view your project list.

 

8.g. Click on the name of your project to open it.

 

8.h. Click on the “Sources” tab. You are now ready to cite a source.

 

9. When you are done with all of your citations and annotations, export the document to Google docs. This puts everything in the correct MLA style.

Historical Character vs. Fictional Analysis

English II

Intro to Sources & How to Approach a Print Resource

Information literacy topics:

  • Determining best sources
  • Developing searching techniques

Objective: To practice how to approach a print resource: evaluating nonfiction print sources for relevance; to develop database searching techniques.

 

1. Presentation: How to approach a print resource:

Question: What is the name of the section of an informational book that often summarizes what it is about?

- Finding aids:

  • The cover:  focus on title, design, author, all clues to the value of the content.
  • The preface/forward/introduction: will often give a summary of the book’s treatment of the topic, and often includes a full overview.
  • The table of contents: the headings may be descriptive, or may be more metaphorical, and not of much help.
  • The index: the index will list all the most pertinent topics in alphabetical order, the number of times that they appear.  They may be extremely complete, or less so. 
  • Review sample and ask students “Is this section relevant to hysterical fits?”

2. Classroom collection of reserved books

Using print sources

- Guidelines: 

  • Sanitize your hands before and after you touch a book.
  • Take pictures of the cover, title page, copyright info and pages you need so you’ll have access to the info anywhere.
  • If you are learning from home, you can ask a classmate to share a print source with you IF you are researching the same person. 

3. Review! Nearpod questions (3)

 

4. Presentation: Choosing the best resource and searching: databases

Discussion Question: What’s the difference between using a database and a website?

 

Recommended databases:

ABC-Clio American History

 

ABC-Clio American History: investigates the people, events, and themes of our nation’s evolution from the explorers of the Americas to today’s headlines

 

Other recommended database:  

 

History Reference Center

History Reference Center features full text for more than 1,990 reference books, encyclopedias, non-fiction books, and academic journals. This content includes historical documents, biographies of historical figures,  full-text reference books, encyclopedias, history books, historical photos and maps, and historical video. 

 

5. Scholarly Database: (paid subscription $$$):  

  • Example:
  • ESBCO: History Reference Center  
  • Often used at college level.
  • May include e-books, encyclopedias, periodicals (journals, magazines, etc.).
  • Offer multiple ways to browse or search, but are less concerned with being attractive than school product databases. 
  • Information is usually NOT organized in topics; you have to search.
  • Gives more searching options, less “teaching” help.
  • Really useful if you don’t want to limit your search to specialized databases, or you don’t know which databases you need.

5.a. Discussion: Scholarly Database: 

EBSCO’s History Reference Center

Main points:

  • Take note of your surroundings:  Look at main menus, search options, etc.. Decide on a starting point for search.
  • Use Advanced search for more power
  • Start simple.  You can always add more words to narrow down.
  • Consider what you are searching for: Subject? Word in text?
  • Use checkbox “limiters” to LIMIT your search by:
  • Full-text.
  • and whatever else is offered
  • Always give yourself more “Search Options”: Boolean? All? Any? ???
  • Always limit to full-text.
  • Notice what appears when you start to type “Salem Witch trials”. How many results do you get? (358 results)  How does it change when you add “women”? “Salem Witch trials women (233 results)
  • Notice the number of hits for each Source Type: Magazines, News Academic Journals, etc..
  • Notice other “limiters” in the left sidebar. Which are useful for our search?
  • Too many results and not really relevant? Add more words to narrow down.
  • Too few results? Broaden your search with fewer words.
  • Save good candidates to look at later.
  • Use more advanced techniques:
  • Try with synonyms or related words. 
  • Use commands (“operators”) to narrow down: AND (to get both terms), OR (for one OR the other), NOT (to filter out the word), apostrophes around several words to get the exact phrase
  • When you identify a good source/article:
  • Follow up on SUBJECT headings that appear in relevant articles.
  • Save your chosen results to avoid losing stuff (use personal lists, email, Save to Google Drive, notes/citation tools, etc.). Allow pop-ups for Google Drive to work correctly.

6. Discussion: What’s the biggest problem we see when students find and use their own web sources?

 

7. Open web resources

In an effort to ensure students are using credible websites, please use ONLY these websites as the librarians have vetted them for you. You may also use the two websites Mr. Clark provided in the description of the assignment. 

 

The Salem Witch Trials Documentary Archive and Transcription Project: Important Persons in the Salem Court Record

The Salem Witch Trials Documentary Archive and Transcription Project at the University of Virginia is a digital collection of primary source materials--books, letters, court records, maps--and modern-day scholarship about the Salem witch trials. The primary source materials are drawn from many different institutions' collections.

 

Although the Archive is supervised by faculty from the University of Virginia, it seems that some of the materials, like the biographical essays about the people involved in the trials seem to be written by university students.

 

The Salem Witch Trials: Biographies of Key Figures in the Salem Witchcraft Trials

The Famous Trials web project, created by Professor Douglas O. Linder at the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Law, includes a section devoted to the Salem witch trials. 

It appears that the biographical information shown was written by professor Linder, and is often focused on his analysis of the role the people played in the trials.  There is also plenty of other information about the participants in the transcriptions (typed versions of original documents or court proceedings from the trial).

Publishing eBooks with BookCreator

Mr. Clark

Graphic Novel (English)

Using BookCreator  (updated 1-2020)

Information literacy topics:

- Using technology tools

 

Objective: To effectively use the BookCreator platform to create an online eBook that takes advantage of the full possible range media contect to present a narrative (children’s book).

 

Learning Expectations: 

Academic-Writing: “Students will produce and distribute a variety of writing designed to entertain, inform, or argue, as well build and present knowledge derived from research.“

Academic-Problem-solving: “Students will use appropriate tools strategically to solve problems.”

 

1. Discussion:

We are going to discover how to use the BookCreator platform together as you begin to produce your eBooks.

 

Look at these examples:

Girls Don't Play Basketball by Leah Ray

Graphic novel-style (narration included, no video)

 

The Magical Moustache by Mrs. Goodwin's 2nd Grade Class

Graphic novel-style (limited voice-over, some video, some sound effects)

 

2. Getting started

- Go to BookCreator.com

- Sign in as a STUDENT. Use your Google @amityschools.org account.

- In “LIBRARIES”, go to “Join a Library”. Use the join code: - 

5JTB9QD

 

- Use the to start your book.
 

3. Add your text, images, and sound. (Hint: Write and refine all your text first in a Google doc so you don’t lose it.)

 

4. Learn how to do more by following these instructions from BookCreator.

MLA Format

MLA Format

NoodleTools Citations and Notes (updated 9-2019)

Information literacy topics:

- Taking notes

- Organizing source citations

- References

- Using technology tools

Objective: To use a web citation generator (NoodleTools) to create citations and bibliographic references. 

 

Learning Expectations: Academic-Writing: “Students will produce and distribute a variety of writing designed to entertain, inform, or argue, as well build and present knowledge derived from research.“

 

1. Discuss objective.

 

2. Sign into your NoodleTools account:

- If you have signed on to NoodleTools during the 2018-19 year:

- Sign in Google Drive first and find the NoodleTool app logo under the

 

- or log on to NoodleTools, using your @amityschools.org Google sign-on. 

 

- If you are new to the district, or did not sign on to NoodleTools in 2018-19:

- Follow these instructions to create a NoodleTools account.

 

3. Student Practice: create a project to begin citations.

Create a project to begin citations.

3.a. Click on “New Project”.

 

3.b. Enter a “Project Title”.

3.c. Choose “MLA” style (for this English class), and click the “Advanced” citation level for full functionality. Click “Submit”.

 

3.d. Write a “Research Question” (think of something related to your topic).

3.e. Write a “Thesis” statement. This is the statement or question you will prove or discuss.

3.f. Click the “Projects” tab to view your project list.

 

3.g. Click on the name of your project to open it.

 

3.h. Click on the “Sources” tab. You are now ready to cite a source.

 

4. Student practice: creating a MANUAL citation for short stories/poems found on the web.

Create a MANUAL citation for a short story/poem found on the web.  

4.a. Return to NoodleTools, and click on “Create a New Citation”.

 

4.b. Answer the question “Where is it?”. Note that the choice here refers to WHERE the source was found, not what KIND of source it is. Choose “Print/In Hand”.

4.c. Answer the question “WHAT is it?”.Choose “Anthology/Collection”.

4.d. Start filling in as much information as you can, copying from the article, and adjusting the text as needed. Notice the pop-up hints.

4.e. Click “SAVE”.


 

Citing your sources within your paper

- How do you cite the article in the body of your paper?

- After the quotation, fact, opinion, or idea that you use in your paper, place your "in-text" citation to credit that source.  Put it at the end of the sentence, before the punctuation mark. 

- The citation is usually the author's last name, followed by a page number (both in parenthesis).

- If you use the author's name in the sentence, then the citation is just the page number (in parenthesis).

- If there is no author, use the first few words of whatever the citation starts with in the "Works Cited" list, with a page number, if there is one.

- If the first few words are of an article, put them in quotes.

Notice:

- In-text citations used for the 1st time.

- In-text citation used 2nd or more times consecutively.

- In-text citation used 2nd time, but not in a row.

- Works Cited list at the end.

- Look at the sample page from Purdue University’s writing site.

- You will need to follow the instructions and examples from a reliable source, like the writing experts at Purdue University’s OWL MLA style pages.

-You can also look at the Amity Librarians’ MLA Quick Guide, with examples from the most common kinds of formats.

 

How do you organize the Works Cited page?  

- The "Works Cited" page goes at the end of the document. Give it the title, "Works Cited".

- Put citations in alphabetical order of author. If there is no author, put citations in order of the first work of the citation.

-Use Noodletools to create your citations and export the document.


 

Introduction to Citations and MLA format

NoodleTools Citations and Notes (updated 9-2019)

Information literacy topics:

- Taking notes

- Organizing source citations

- References

- Using technology tools

 

Objective: To use a web citation generator (NoodleTools) to create citations and bibliographic references. 

 

Learning Expectations: Academic-Writing: “Students will produce and distribute a variety of writing designed to entertain, inform, or argue, as well build and present knowledge derived from research.“

 

 

1. Sign into your NoodleTools account:

- If you have signed on to NoodleTools during the 2018-19 year:

- Sign in Google Drive first and find the NoodleTool app logo under the

 

- or log on to NoodleTools, using your @amityschools.org Google sign-on. 

 

- If you are new to the district, or did not sign on to NoodleTools in 2018-19

- Follow these instructions to create a NoodleTools account.

 

2. Student Practice: create a project to begin citations.

Create a project to begin citations.

2.a. Click on “New Project”.

 

2.b. Enter a “Project Title”.

2.c. Choose “MLA” style (for this English class), and click the “Advanced” citation level for full functionality. Click “Submit”.

 

2.d. Write a “Research Question” (think of something related to your topic).

2.e. Write a “Thesis” statement. This is the statement or question you will prove or discuss.

2.f. Click the “Projects” tab to view your project list.

 

2.g. Click on the name of your project to open it.

 

2.h. Click on the “Sources” tab. You are now ready to cite a source.

 

3. Sample practice: creating a MANUAL citation for a video found on the web.

Create a MANUAL citation for a video found on the web.  

3.a. Go to this video found on the Critical Media Project website

3.b. First, notice that the video is actually NOT from that site, but really from a DIFFERENT site.  Go to the real site where it originates from.

3.c. Return to NoodleTools, and click on “Create a New Citation”.

 

3.d. Answer the question “Where is it?”. Note that the choice here refers to WHERE the source was found, not what KIND of source it is. Choose “Web Site”.

3.e. Answer the question “WHAT is it?”.Choose “Video Clip (Online)”.

3.f. Start filling in as much information as you can, copying from the article, and adjusting the text as needed. Notice the pop-up hints.

- URL: find it

- Date of publication: find it

- Most recent date of access [ today?]:

- Title of video clip: find it

- Click "Archival video (not user-contributed)", because this is not a site where users can upload videos.

- Name of the site: the name of the specific site (hint, it is one of several radio stations)

- Publisher of the site: (often is the copyright holder at the bottom of the page)

- Contributors/Role: The author of the written article is also the producer, because her name appears at the end of the video (here called "contributor").

3.g. Click “SAVE”.

Compare your finished citation to this sample...

 

Hsu, Jennifer. "Being 12: 'People Think I'm Supposed to Talk Ghetto, Whatever That Is.'" WNYC, New York Public Radio, 8 July 2015, www.wnyc.org/story/people-sometimes-think-im-supposed-talk-ghetto-whatever-kids-race. Accessed 24 Sept. 2019. 

 

Citing your sources within your paper

- How do you cite the article in the body of your paper?

- After the quotation, fact, opinion, or idea that you use in your paper, place your "in-text" citation to credit that source.  Put it at the end of the sentence, before the punctuation mark. 

- The citation is usually the author's last name, followed by a page number (both in parenthesis).

- If you use the author's name in the sentence, then the citation is just the page number (in parenthesis).

- If there is no author, use the first few words of whatever the citation starts with in the "Works Cited" list, with a page number, if there is one.

- If the first few words are of an article, put them in quotes.

Notice:

- In-text citations used for the 1st time.

- In-text citation used 2nd or more times consecutively.

- In-text citation used 2nd time, but not in a row.

- Works Cited list at the end.

- Look at the sample page from Purdue University’s writing site.

- You will need to follow the instructions and examples from a reliable source, like the writing experts at Purdue University’s OWL MLA style pages.

-You can also look at the Amity Librarians’ MLA Quick Guide, with examples from the most common kinds of formats.

 

How do you organize the Works Cited page?  

- The "Works Cited" page goes at the end of the document. Give it the title, "Works Cited".

- Put citations in alphabetical order of author. If there is no author, put citations in order of the first work of the citation.

Best Sources for Creating a Reader

Clark, K.

English II

Introduction to Online Sources (updated 5-2019, V.Hulse)

  • Information literacy topics covered
  • Determining the best sources
  • Searching strategies for information
  • Using technology tools

During class:

1. Explain objective: To use provided sources to locate materials to create a reader.

 

2. Present overview of sources:

Locating relevant sources to create a reader

2.a.Poetry Sources    

2.b. Short Story Sources

  • Short Story Guide
    • http://www.shortstoryguide.com/
    • A website that provides titles for short stories and groups them thematically. Search for the PDFs of the actual texts via Google.
  • Short Story Index (books located on cart)
    • A chronological publishing of short stories from 1954 to 2004. The stories are arranged alphabetically by author’s last name and subject. Look up short stories by subject and then locate the actual texts via Google.

2.c. Non-fiction news article/Informational Text

  • Academic Search Complete
    • Access via Amity library website, Find Online Stuff, By Database Name, Academic Search Complete)
    • Filter search results by FULL TEXT, MAGAZINES, and NEWSPAPERS
  • ResearchIT One Search for High Schools
    • Access via Amity library website, Find Online Stuff, By Database Name, ResearchIT CT OneSearch)
    • Filter search results by FULL TEXT, MAGAZINES, and NEWSPAPERS

2.d. Songs

  • Conduct a web search

2.e. Art/Sculptures/Photographs

  • Google Arts and Culture
    • Explore collections from around the world with Google Arts & Culture, created by Google Cultural Institute.
  • Art Resource
    • Art Resource is the world's largest fine art stock photo archive, with more than 1,000,000 searchable fine art images from the world's leading sources, available for licensing to all media.
    • Use the Advanced Search feature.
  • Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Online Catalog
    • The collections of the Prints & Photographs Division include photographs, fine and popular prints and drawings, posters, and architectural and engineering drawings.While international in scope, the collections are particularly rich in materials produced in, or documenting the history of the United States and the lives, interests and achievements of the American people.
    • Conduct a web search.   

Developing an Annotated Bibliography

William Rocco

English II

Huck Finn: Developing an Annotated Bibliography (updated 4-2019)

Information literacy topics:

-Determining best sources

-Communicating new knowledge

-Creating/Writing a research-based product

-Using technology tools to create a citation.

 

1. Objective:

To understand what an annotated bibliography is and to produce an annotated bibliography of relevant resources found.

 

Discussion: Creating an Annotated Bibliography

What is an annotated bibliography?

 

Look at this sample from OWL Purdue. 
 

          The annotations included with each source generally follow this format:    

 

-Summary:

A summary includes an overview explaining what it is about.  

 

-Assessment:

An assessment should be your judgement on the reliability of the source’s author/organization (credentials, expertise, trustworthy, etc.).  

 

-Reflection:

A reflection should discuss in what way is the source relevant and how the source can be used to cite evidence that supports your claim.  

  

 There are 2 ways to create an annotated bibliography in Noodletools.

-After you have entered the necessary information to create a citation,  click save & add annotation.

                                                                                                        

 

                             OR

 

-Insert your annotation under the dropdown on the right under “Options” and select “Edit annotation.”

2. Sample:

 

Based on the article titled: "The Los Angeles Riots Revisited: The Changing Face of the Los Angeles Unified School District and the Challenge for Educators" here is a sample annotation, addressing the required criteria.

Dr. Donna M. Davis, a Professor in the School of Education at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, has over 30 years experience in education. She taught high school English for 10 years before earning her doctorate at the University of Kansas. Dr. Davis teaches courses in the history and philosophy of education at UMKC and has been published in numerous scholarly journals in the areas of urban education, multicultural education, philosophy of education, history of education, arts education, and social justice. The portion of the article pertinent to my research is how there was a significant decrease in African American students enrolled in the Los Angeles school district following the Rodney King riots. This article questions whether schools could serve a larger role in preventing incidents like the Rodney King riots from occurring again. It brings up the idea that educational institutions could help develop positive relationships/interactions for students of diverse backgrounds, which ties into my research regarding how schools can address these challenges.

Introduction to Citations/Noodletools

K. Clark

Expository Writing: Research-based arguments

NoodleTools Citations and Notes (updated 4-2018, V. Hulse)

Information literacy topics:

  • Taking notes
  • Organizing source citations
  • References
  • Using technology tools

Objective: To understand and define the concept of a research “citation”, and to use a web citation generator (NoodleTools) to create citations and bibliographic references. To describe three categories of notes based on research, and to write and organize notes online in NoodleTools.

 

Before class: Students have begun to find sources to identify a topic for research, and have some experience with other citation software.

 

During class:

1: Find the activities for this class, at:

Amity website→High SchoolAHS Library Information Center

(tab) Find Online Stuff→By Subject→English

(tab) Class Projects →K. Clark→ NoodleTools Citations and Notes

 

Part A: Understanding and Creating Citations

 

2. Explain objective

Discussion: Review previous experience with creating citations-”What software have you been using to create citations?”  Explain why we use Noodletools.

 

Students brainstorm the answer to the question, “What is a citation?”

A citation is the complete set information you need to tell where an idea or quotation came from, and to be able to find that source again.

 

3. Discussion (OR show video guide): Students answer the question, “What kind of information is included in a citation?”

(Use Google presentation to illustrate concepts during discussion)

Citations can include the following information, and more...

a. author

b. title

c. place of publication

d. publisher (and more about where it can be found)

e.date of publication

f. date you found it (accessed date, electronic resources)

g. web address (URL)

 

4. Discussion: Students analyze sample citation to see which elements it includes.

Students answer: “What kind of source is it?”

Begley, Sharon, et al. "The Anatomy of Violence." Newsweek, vol. 149, no. 18, 30 Apr. 2007, pp. 40-43. Academic Search Complete, web.b.ebscohost.com. Accessed 27 Apr. 2018.

 

5. Students log into accounts in NoodleTools and update “My profile.”


 


 

5.f. Fill in all the information. If you put in your amityschools.org Google address in “Google Account ID”, you will be able to link to Google Docs.

Click “Save Profile”.

 

6. Student Practice: create a project to begin citations.

Create a project to begin citations.

6.a. Click on “New Project”.

 

6.b. Enter a “Project Title”.

6.c. Choose “MLA” style (for this English class), and click the “Advanced” citation level for full functionality. Click “Submit”.

 

6.d. Write a “Research Question” (think of something related to your topic).

6.e. Write a “Thesis” statement. This is the statement or question you will prove or discuss.

6.f. Click the “Projects” tab to view your project list.

 

6.g. Click on the name of your project to open it.

 

6.h. Click on the “Sources” tab. You are now ready to cite a source.

 

7. Student practice: creating a COPY AND PASTE citation for a database article (Academic Search Complete).

Create a COPY AND PASTE citation for a database article (Academic Search Complete).  

7.a. Go to this article from the Academic Search Complete database: “The Anatomy of Violence”.

7.b. Find the “Cite” button on the right side of the screen and find the MLA citation.

7.c. COPY the citation for practice (use MLA format).

7.d. Return to NoodleTools, and click on “Create a New Citation”.

7.e. Answer the question “Where is it?”. Note that the choice here refers to WHERE the source was found, not what KIND of source it is. Choose “Database”.

7.f. Answer the question “WHAT is it?”.Choose “Magazine” (because the citation shows this article was written for Newsweek).

 

7.g. Click “Quick Cite”: Copy & Paste Citation”.  Paste in the citation you copied.

7.h. Click “Submit”. Look at your citation.

 

Begley, Sharon, et al. "The Anatomy of Violence." Newsweek, vol. 149, no. 18, 30 Apr. 2007, pp. 40-43. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=24834402&site=ehost-live&scope=site.

.

You can check the accuracy of your citation by looking at the MLA guide HERE.

 

8. Student practice: creating a MANUAL citation for a database article (Academic Search Complete).  

8.a. Return to the previous article from the Academic Search Complete: “The Anatomy of Violence”.

8.b. Back in NoodleTools, from the Sources tab, click on “Create a New Citation”.

8.c. Answer the question “Where is it?”. Once again choose “Database”.

8.d. Answer the question “WHAT is it?”. Once again choose “Magazine”.


 

 

8.e. Start filling in as much information as you can, copying from the article, and adjusting the text as needed. Notice the pop-up hints.

8.f. Click “Submit”.

8.g. Compare your finished citation to the citation below. You can check the accuracy of your citation by looking at the MLA guide HERE.

Helpful pointers:

Did you fill in the date you got the article?

Did you use the HOME page URL since the article URL was so long and complicated?

 

8.g. Now compare your two citations.

(copy/paste)

Begley, Sharon, et al. "The Anatomy of Violence." Newsweek, vol. 149, no. 18, 30 Apr. 2007, pp. 40-43. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=24834402&site=ehost-live&scope=site.

 

(manual)

Begley, Sharon, et al. "The Anatomy of Violence." Newsweek, vol. 149, no. 18, 30 Apr. 2007, pp. 40-43. Academic Search Complete, web.b.ebscohost.com. Accessed 27 Apr. 2018.

 

If they are different, it is usually because you either did not include all the citation information, OR because the citation you copied from the database was not correct, OR because the citation software is not always right.  What do think are the reasons here?

Remember that databases are not always capable of interpreting information correctly, especially unusual author formats.

 

9. Student practice: Creating a MANUAL citation for a website.

9.a. Go to this document from the FBI website.

9.b. Return to NoodleTools, and complete the steps to make a new citation.

9.c. Click on “Create a New Citation”.

9.d. Answer the question “Where is it?” Choose website.  

9.e. Choose “Government Publication”.

9.f. Fill in all the relevant information. Click “Submit”.

          9.g. Check your citation--Does it look like this?
 

Federal Bureau of Investigation. Active Shooter Incidents in the United

    States in 2014 and 2015. U.S. Department of Justice,      

     www.fbi.gov/file-repository/activeshooterincidentsus_2014-2015.

     pdf/view. Accessed 27 Apr. 2018.

 

10. Discussion: What’s the most challenging/frustrating aspect of creating citations?


 

Part B: Understanding Notes

 

10. Brainstorming and discussion: What is a note? What is the purpose of taking notes?

Purpose of notes: Your notes should be focused on information RELEVANT to your topic.

A. Recording empirical facts

B. Recording author’s conclusions

C. Recording your own synthesis of facts or author’s conclusions

 

Part C: Creating and Organizing Notes in Noodletools

11. Students create a new note.

Create a new note.

11.a. On the “Projects” page, click on your practice project to get to the “Dashboard” tab. Once there, click on the “Notecards” tab.,

 

11.b. Click “+New” to create a new note.

 

Consider this topic: Broad topic, “The Relationship between Mass Violence and Fame”

 

12. Student practice-Read and take note to record empirical facts.

12.a. Use any source you’ve identified and ready an excerpt.  

12.b. Identify a meaningful FACT from this excerpt.


 

12.c. Write a “Title” that represents the basic idea of your note.

12.d. Choose one of your source citations from the dropdown menu (pretend that one of your practice citations is for this source).

12.e. Cut and paste a “Direct quotation”, or a “paraphrase or summary” of the fact you have identified.

12.f. Hint: if you paraphrase, you should take the time to create a well-written note NOW, that could get slotted right in your paper.


 

 

12.g. Click “Save and Close”.

 

13. Convert notes to outlines.

 

13.a. Click the “Add+” button to create a few headings. You can change the name of topics by double-clicking, and rearrange the hierarchy by dragging and dropping.


 

 

13.b. Now DRAG one of your piles, or loose notes, right on top of any outline heading on the right until the heading is highlighted, and DROP it there.  It will now appear as a note in that heading of the outline. You can rearrange the notes in the outline by dragging and dropping.

 

14. Export or print notes.

 

14.a. On the Notecard desktop, click “Print” to export your saved notes.

14.b. Notice the export options.  Choose one, and practice downloading exported notes. Note that choosing Google requires signing into your Google account.

 

15. Create the beginnings of a formatted paper in NoodleTools

15.a. In reality, the “Paper” option does not do any automated formatting. It simply opens a new Google Doc from NoodleTools.

 

My suggestion is to build a paper by copying and pasting Notecards as they are exported to Google Docs. Once all notes are compiled, and you begin writing, you can start to add citations and footnotes, if needed.


 

16. Cite your sources within your paper.

  • How do you cite the article in the body of your paper? In general, in MLA  format, when you include an idea or quotation in the text from a research source, you generally include the author’s name and the page number, where there is one.
  • You will need to follow the instructions and examples from a reliable source, like the writing experts at Purdue University’s OWL MLA style pages or Amity’s MLA Cheat Sheet.

Online Sources for Research

Student Instructions

Clark, K.

Expository Writing

Introduction to Online Sources (updated 5-2018, R. Musco)

Information literacy topics covered

  • Determining the best sources
  • Searching strategies for information
  • Evaluating sources
  • Using technology tools

 

1. Objective: To distinguish between different formats of research materials available online and judge the reliability of information, and to develop and practice searching strategies for relevant information.

 

2..Discussion: What are the different types of online databases sources available? (Find through Amity’s  Library Databases).  Notes are included at end of instructions for reference.

2.a.  Specialized Academic Databases (usually paid subscription $$$):

  • EBSCO’s GreenFILE (available free through ResearchIT CT with library card)

2.b. Multi-disciplinary Academic Databases (paid subscription $$$).

2.c. Library “Aggregators”.

2.d. Open Web Sources

 

3.a. Discussion:  Multi-disciplinary Academic Database:

EBSCO’s Academic Search Complete : (available free through ResearchIT CT with library card)

 

3.b. Practice search

EBSCO’s Academic Search Complete, and find a relevant article that addresses your topic.

Use tools to search for topic, play around for a few minutes.

  • Take note of your surroundings:  
  • Use Advanced Search
  • Limit to Full Text.
  • Use other limiters for KIND of material.
  • Follow subject leads.
  • Save results.
  • Choose an article, skim it.
  • Prepare to share one observation that you came up with about how searching works.

3.c. Share sample, Discuss

4.a. Discussion: Library “Aggregator”..

OneSearch from ResearchIT CT  (available free through ResearchIT CT with library card)

(no practice, because it is the same as all EBSCO databases.)

 

5.a. Discussion:  Open web source

Federal Bureau of Investigation: “Violent Crime, is one of the focuses of the FBI’s work, and a subdivision of its web site.

 

5.b. Practice search

Do a Google Search and find a piece of relevant PRIMARY SOURCE information that addresses their topic.

  • Browse the site.
  • Identify some information.
  • Prepare to share one observation that you came up with about how searching works.

5.c. Share sample, Discuss

Additional Tips:

  • Get a library card so you can use ResearchIT CT at home.
  • Practice searching from our web page:
  • You are MORE likely to find something useful for school FASTER from a paid database than from a web search.
  • Everything that ISN’T useful has NOT been included.
  • Everything you find in a full-text search is really available, as opposed to just being a summary (abstract).
  • You can avoid “pseudo-authoritative” sources written by people who confuse opinion with science, and beliefs with objective facts.

K. Clark

K. Clark

Online Resources

Huck Finn Research Paper

Objective:To understand the characteristics of available reliable print and online sources for research, concentrating on encyclopedic/reference works and popular, websites, and to practice searching these sources.

Amity website→High SchoolAHS Library Information Center

Find Online Stuff→By Subject→English→Class Projects →K Clark

Discussion: quick tour of sources for today’s practice (notes are included at end of instructions for reference):  Types of online databases discussed today.

Search our library catalogs from Destiny Quest to find all our printed books, magazines and journals, textbooks, encyclopedias, music CDs, movies (DVD and VHS).


A number of books have been reserved on the topic and placed on a cart.  See additional resource list.

 

Additional Open Web Resources:

Library of Congress

Mark Twain’s Huckleberry Finn: Controversy at the Heart of a Classic This is a teacher’s approach to addressing Huckleberry Finn. Some good links to primary sources.

PBS

Huck finn in Context: A Teaching Guide, from PBS This is a unit plan on how to teach Huck Finn. It discusses the issues from the teacher’s point of view.

Amity High School, Amity Region 5 School District, Woodbridge, CT 06525, 203-397-4844 Librarians: Robert F. Musco and Victoria Hulse Copyright 2017