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AHS Subject Guides: Science: Cappiello

This guide includes print and online resources for Science: Courses include: Biology, Earth Science, Environmental Science, Chemistry, Physics, Forensics, Human Anatomy, etc.

Intro to Online Sources for Science Periodicals

Biology I (updated 3-2020)

Introduction to Online Sources for Science Periodicals

Information literacy topics: 

-Determining best sources

-Searching strategies for information

-Evaluating sources

-Using technology tools

 

1. Objective: To distinguish between different types of databases and periodicals available online for science research, to judge the reliability of online sources, and to develop and practice searching strategies, such as the use of limiters, for relevant information.

 

Learning Expectations:  Academic-Problem-solving: “Students will use appropriate tools strategically to solve problems.”

 

2. Presentation/Discussion: What is a periodical? What are the different types?

(use Google presentation prompts from College Research Class)

Types of periodicals: Look at the Lesson Plan to review the details of what we discussed, and Learn about the criteria that defines each type.

-Scholarly and Research Journals (Peer-reviewed, written by recognized, credentialed experts, meant to report original research and further knowledge in the field among experts)

-Professional, Trade and Industry (for insiders, not exactly “peer-reviewed”, writers may be industry experts, may be accomplished journalists who are not experts, meant to report trends to inform industry/professional practices to insiders)

-News or Commentary (wide range of reporting quality and information vetting possible, writers not necessarily subject experts, but may be accomplished journalists, may not even be good journalists,  meant to inform, influence, and/or entertain the general public)

-Popular magazines (wide range of reporting quality and information vetting possible, writers not necessarily subject experts, but may be accomplished journalists, may not even be good journalists,  meant to inform, influence, and/or entertain the general public)

 

3. Discussion:

What are the different types of online databases sources to find articles from periodicals?

A. School Product Database Sites (paid subscription $$$): 

-Includes articles from many different kinds of periodicals, , including proprietary materials.

-Example: 

Science in Context (available through Amity)

SIRS

B. Specialized Databases (paid subscription $$$): 

-Includes articles from many different periodicals in specific subjects. 

Examples: 

PsycINFO (psychology, and related fields, not through Amity)

EBSCO’s ERIC (Education)

 

4. School Product Database Site: Science in Context and SIRS, mix of periodicals.

Main points: 

-Look at the Lesson Plan to review what we discussed.

 

5. Search Science in Context or SIRS and find a relevant article that addresses your topic.

-Use tools to search for topic, play around for a few minutes.

-Choose an article, skim it.

 

Additional Tips:

-Practice searching the databases discussed from our web page:

-Science in Context

-Academic Search Complete

-ResearchIT CT/Resources for High Schools/ (all the databases for journals)

-You are MORE likely to find something useful for school FASTER from a paid database than from a web search.

-Everything that ISN’T useful has NOT been included.

-Everything you find in a full-text search is really available, as opposed to just being a summary (abstract).

-You can avoid “pseudo-authoritative” sources written by people who confuse opinion with science, and beliefs with objective facts.

Amity High School, Amity Region 5 School District, Woodbridge, CT 06525, 203-397-4844 Librarians: Robert F. Musco and Victoria Hulse Copyright 2017