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AHS Subject Guides: Art: Valenzuela

Courses include: Design, Advertising, Graphic Art, Drawing, Painting, Art History, Ceramics, etc.

Creating Citations with NoodleTools

Valenzuela

Art History (updated 9-2018)

Introduction to Citations, References, and Note-taking with NoodleTools

Information literacy topics:

-Taking notes

-Organizing source citations

-References

-Using technology tools

 

Objective: To understand and define the concept of a research “citation”, and to use a web citation generator, NoodleTools, to create citations and bibliographic references, and organize notes.

 

1: Find the activities for this class, at:

Amity website→High SchoolAHS Library Information Center

(tab) Find Online Stuff→By Subject→Art

(tab) Class Projects →Valenzuela→ Creating Citations with NoodleTools

 

Part A: Understanding and Creating Citations

 

2. Discuss objective.

 

3. Answer the question, “What kind of information is included in a citation?”

 

4. Answer the question, “What kind of source is this?” (see below). What parts of the citation can you identify?

 

Vidler, Muir. "'When People Have More Than £30m, They Go Crackers.'" New

    Statesman, vol. 140, no. 5068, 29 Aug. 2011, p. 36. Academic Search

    Complete, web.a.ebscohost.com. Accessed 16 Sept. 2018

 

5. Sign up for your account in NoodleTools.

 

Activate your own personal account through your @amityschools.org Google account.

Go to the NoodleTools log-in screen.

Enter your @amityschools.org Google account email.

Click “Sign In with Google”.


 

 

Re-enter your Amity Google account email, and your Google password.

 

For 7th/8th/9th Grades: (other grades, look here).

Click on “Create a new account”.

Click “Submit”.

 

Next:

Choose “I am a student”.

Click “Submit”.

 

Choose your graduation year.

Click “Save Profile”.

 

Under “My Profile” make sure your  first and last names are complete.

 


 

You are now in Noodle Tools!  

Your new username is your Google @amityschools.org email address and password.
 

6. Create a project to begin citations.

6.a. Click on “New Project”.

 

6.b. Enter a “Project Title”.

6.c. Choose “MLA” style (for this Art class), and click the “Advanced” citation level for full functionality. Click “Submit”.

 

6.d. Write a “Research Question” (think of something related to your topic).

6.e. Write a “Thesis” statement. This is the statement or question you will prove or discuss.

6.f. Click the “Projects” tab to view your project list.

 

6.g. Click on the name of your project to open it.

 

6.h. Click on the “Sources” tab. You are now ready to cite a source.

 

7. Create a MANUAL citation for a database article.

7.a. Go to this article titled: "When People Have More Than £30m, They Go Crackers", from the EBSCO publishing company’s database Academic Search Complete.

7.b. Back in NoodleTools, from the Sources tab, click on “Create a New Citation”.

7.c. Answer the question “Where is it?”. Once again choose “Database”.

7.d. Answer the question “WHAT is it?”. Choose “Magazine” because this is an article in a magazine called “New Statesman”.

7.e. Start filling in as much information as you can, copying from the article:

-DOI (Direct Object Identifier): there is none listed

-URL: find the "permalink" on the right, because it does not change.

-Name of database: find it

-Database accession number: find it

-Most recent date of access: (today)

-Author: find it

-Article title: find it

-Pages: find it

-Name of journal: find it

-Volume: find it

-Issue: find it

-Publication date: find it

-Series: there is none listed

 

7.f. Click “Submit”.

7.g. Compare your finished citation to the citation below. You can check the accuracy of your citation by looking at the MLA style guide HERE.

 

Vidler, Muir. "'When People Have More Than £30m, They Go Crackers.'" New

    Statesman, vol. 140, no. 5068, 29 Aug. 2011, p. 36. Academic Search

    Complete, web.a.ebscohost.com. Accessed 16 Sept. 2018.

 

A note about copy/paste citations available in databases:

Remember that databases are not always capable of interpreting information correctly, especially unusual author formats, or distinguishing magazines from other kinds of journals.  It is recommended that you ALWAYS create your own citation, plugging in the information.

 

8. Create a MANUAL citation from a web source.

8.a. Go to this article entitled “Elmyr de Hory: A Master of Deception”, from the website:

Intent to Deceive: Fakes and Forgeries in the Art World, the online companion to the traveling exhibition, presented by International Arts & Artists.

8.b. Back in NoodleTools, from the Sources tab, click on “Create a New Citation”.

8.c. Answer the question “Where is it?”. Once again choose “Website”.

8.d. Answer the question “WHAT is it?”. Choose “Web page” because this online article is really a page in the larger online exhibition web site.

8.e. Start filling in as much information as you can, copying from the article:

-URL: find it

-Date of publication: find it; if none, leave it blank.

-Most recent date of access: use it

-Contributors: if you don’t find an author, leave it blank.

-Web Page or document/article title: Find the article title

-Name of the website: find it (not the same as the publisher)

-Publisher of the site: Find it (bottom of page)

-Editors of the site as a whole: hint: “About”

8.f. Click “Submit”.

8.g. Compare your finished citation to the citation below. You can check the accuracy of your citation by looking at the MLA style guide HERE.

 

"Elmyr de Hory: A Master of Deception." Intent to Deceive: Fakes and Forgeries  in the Art World, edited by Jeri Monroe and Patricia Hevey, International  Arts & Artists, www.intenttodeceive.org/forger-profiles/elmyr-de-hory/.  Accessed 16 Sept. 2018.

 

Citing your sources within your paper.

-How do you cite the article in the body of your paper?

-How do you cite the article in the body of your paper?

-How do you cite the article in the body of your paper? In general, in MLA  format, when you include an idea or quotation in the text from a research source, you generally include the author’s name and the page number, where there is one.

-You will need to follow the instructions and examples from a reliable source, like the writing experts at Purdue University’s Owl Writing Lab MLA style pages.

-You can also look at the Amity Librarians’ MLA Quick Guide, with examples from the most common kinds of formats.

Art History: Introduction to Online Sources

Introduction to Art History

Introduction to Online Sources (updated 9-2018

Information literacy topics covered

-Determining the best sources

-Searching strategies for information

-Evaluating sources

-Using technology tools

1. Objective: To distinguish between different formats of research materials available online and judge the reliability of information, and to practice and develop searching strategies for relevant information

 

2. Overview of periodicals (notes are included at end of instructions):

What is a periodical? What are the different types?

Types of periodicals:

-?

-?

-?

-?

 

3. Overview of database sources:
What are the different types of online databases sources available? (notes are included at end of instructions):

3.A. School Product Database Sites (paid subscription $$$):

Examples:

-ABC Clio: Pop Culture Universe

 

3.B. Specialized Academic Databases (usually paid subscription $$$):

Examples:

-EBSCO: Biography Reference Bank

 

3.C. Multi-disciplinary Academic Databases (paid subscription $$$):

Examples:

-EBSCO: Academic Search Complete

 

3.D. Free Web Sites

Example:

-Exhibition website: Intent to Deceive: Fakes and Forgeries in the Art World

 

3.E. Library “Aggregators”.

Offer searching of all or most databases from a single search box.

Example:

University Libraries, ResearchIT CT (iConn) (the Connecticut State Online Library)

 

4. Sources for today’s practice:

-Multi-disciplinary Academic Databases

-Open Web Source

 

5.a. Discussion:  Multi-disciplinary Academic Database:

EBSCO’s Academic Search Complete: Information from many different fields, with a mix of periodicals, and lots of peer-review journals, and a college-level search functions.

Use the same strategies, but it is more powerful, gives more options, less “teaching” help.

 

5.b. Practice: Search EBSCO’s Academic Search Complete, and find a relevant article that addresses the topic.

Search for:

Elmyr de Hory

Han van Meegeren

Robert Driessen

Yves Chaudron

Ely Sakhai

John Myatt

Eric Hebborn

Ken Perenyi

Riccardo Riccardi and Alfredo Fioravanti

Guy Hain

 

Use tools to search for topic, play around for a few minutes.

-Always choose an “Advanced Search”.

-Always limit to full-text.

-Start simple.  You can always add more words to narrow down.

-Consider what you are searching for: Subject? Word in text?

-Use checkbox ¨limiters¨ to LIMIT your search by: Date, or Kind of publication

-Too many results and not really relevant? Add more words to narrow down.

-Too few results? Broaden your search with fewer words.

-Save good candidates to look at later.

-Try with synonyms or related words (weapons, armament, arms, ammunition, etc. etc.)

-Use commands (“operators”) to narrow down: AND (to get both terms), OR (for one OR the other), NOT (to filter out the word), apostrophes around several words like “free speech” or “first amendment” to get the exact phrase

-Follow up on subject leads that appear in relevant articles (how about “FORGERY of paintings” and “FORGERY”?).

-Save your chosen results to avoid losing stuff (use personal lists, email, notes/citation tools, etc.). Add a username and password to save searches and results.

 

5.c. Share sample

-Choose an article, skim it.

-Prepare to share one observation that you came up with about how searching works.

 

6.a. Discussion:  Discussion: Free web source

The website of an exhibition entitled: Intent to Deceive: Fakes and Forgeries in the Art World, an online companion to a traveling exhibition created by the International Arts and Artists.

 

6.b. Practice: Search

The website of an exhibition entitled: Intent to Deceive: Fakes and Forgeries in the Art World, an online companion to a traveling exhibition created by the International Arts and Artists.  and find a relevant article that addresses their topic.

-Browse the site.

-Identify some information.

-Prepare to share one observation that you came up with about how searching works.

 

Additional Tips:

-Get a library card so you can use the Connecticut library at ResearchIT CT at home.

-Practice searching from our web page:

-You are MORE likely to find something useful for school FASTER from a paid database than from a web search.

-Everything that ISN’T useful has NOT been included.

-Everything you find in a full-text search is really available, as opposed to just being a summary (abstract).

-You can avoid “pseudo-authoritative” sources written by people who confuse opinion with science, and beliefs with objective facts.

Website Evaluation

Art History

Finding and Evaluating Open Web Sources (updated 2018-19)

Information literacy topics:

-Determining best sources

-Searching strategies for information

-Evaluating sources

-Using technology tools

 

Objective: To learn to find relevant and reliable open web research sources, to evaluate these sources for reliability, and to use appropriate technology tools.

 

1.Go to activity guide online at:

Amity website→High SchoolAHS Library Information Center

Find Online Stuff→By Subject→History→Class Projects →Rocco College Research→Finding and Evaluating Open Web Sources

 

2. Individual Analysis:

Consider a web source. Imagine you are looking for information related to well-known art forgers throughout history.

Students skim this document, from top to bottom, left to right:
Exhibition website: Intent to Deceive: Fakes and Forgeries in the Art World

 

2.b. Respond to this statement. You have 3 minutes:

“This web resource has been judged to offer credible information that is appropriate for academic research. Find at least 3 reasons to show that this is true.”

 

3. Discussion: Share reasons why this website is appropriate for research (why the information here can be trusted).

 

4. Presentation/discussion: Brainstorm and list various search terms that might be used to find sources for this topic.

 

-Think of key words or common expressions specific to the topic

-Think of synonyms:

-Think of the most important terms:

-Think of terms that might sometimes be too limiting:

-Use “...” for phrases, ANDs, ORs, and parenthesis to structure search

 

Sample search: implicit racism america


5. Practice: Search for a reliable research site, identifying the following information on this FORM. The source does NOT have to be reliable; all that matters is evaluating it thoroughly.

What is ART?

What is art?  It is essential to THINK about the question "what is art?" when taking art history. Who decides what "art" is anyway? Below is a collection of journal articles addressing this very question. 

Says who?  Who decides what is art?  Kincheloe article.

"What is Art?": Questions (and Answers) About the Question. Lang article.

What Happens When We Ask, "What Is Art?" Jeffers article.

What is art? A definition. Ruckstuhl article

What is Art? Miya article.

Amity High School, Amity Region 5 School District, Woodbridge, CT 06525, 203-397-4844 Librarians: Robert F. Musco and Victoria Hulse Copyright 2017