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AHS Subject Guides: Reading: 7. Creating Citations in NoodleTools

This guide includes information literacy lessons created to support our Reading program.

7. Creating Citations in NoodleTools

Literacy Workshop

Introduction to Citations and References with NoodleTools (updated 3-2019)

Information literacy topics:

- Taking notes

- Organizing source citations

- References

- Using technology tools

 

Objective: To understand and define the concept of a research “citation”, and to use a web citation generator (NoodleTools) to create citations and bibliographic references.

 

1: Find the activities for this class, at:

Google SearchAmity Library

(tab) Find Online StuffBy SubjectReading

(tab) Literacy WorkshopCreating Citations in NoodleTools


 

Part A: Understanding and Creating Citations

 

2. Answer the question: “What is a citation?”. Start at 00:41 sec.

 

3. Presentation:View the video, “NoodleTools Tutorial Introduction”, Start at 00:41 sec, and eliminate the wait time.

 

4. Discussion: Analyze this sample citation to see which elements it includes.

“What kind of source is it?”

“Identify each information element of the citation.”

 

Robinson, Eugene. "Voter Fraud is Not the Problem." Washington Post, 25 Sep 2012, p. A.19. SIRS Issues Researcher, http://sks.sirs.com. Accessed 31 Jan. 2018.

 

5. Students sign up for accounts in NoodleTools.

- Students who have signed on to NoodleTools on or after September, 2018:

- Using your @amityschools.org Google sign-on to log on to NoodleTools.

- Students who have NOT signed on to NoodleTools on or after September, 2018:

- Follow these instructions to create a NoodleTools account.

 

6. Create a project to begin citations.

6.a. Click on “New Project”.

 

6.b. Enter a “Project Title”.

6.c. Choose “MLA” style (for this class), and click the “Advanced” citation level for full functionality. Click “Submit”.

 

6.d. Write a “Research Question” (think of something related to your topic).

6.e. Write a “Thesis” statement. This is the statement or question you will prove or discuss.

6.f. Click the “Projects” tab to view your project list.

 

6.g. Click on the name of your project to open it.

 

6.h. Click on the “Sources” tab. You are now ready to cite a source.

 

7. Create a COPY AND PASTE citation for a database article.

7.a. Go to this article from the SIRS (Student Issues Research) database, titled “Voter Fraud Is Not the Problem.

7.b. Click on “CITE” in the left of the page.

7.c. COPY the citation (use the MLA format choice).

7.d. Return to NoodleTools, and click on “Create a New Citation”.

7.e. Answer the question “Where is it?”. Note that the choice here refers to WHERE the source was found, not what KIND of source it is. Choose “Database”.

7.f. Answer the question “WHAT is it?”. Choose “Newspaper”.

 

7.g. Click “Quick Cite”: Copy & Paste Citation”.  Paste in the citation you copied.

7.h. Click “Submit”. Look at your citation.

 

Robinson, Eugene. "Voter Fraud is Not the Problem." Washington Post, 25 Sep 2012, pp. A.19. SIRS Issues Researcher, http://sks.sirs.com.


8. Create a MANUAL citation for a database article.

8.a. Go to the same article from the SIRS (Student Issues Research) database, titled “Voter Fraud Is Not the Problem.

8.b. From the Sources tab, click on “Create a New Citation”.

8.c. Answer the question “Where is it?”.

Once again choose “Database”.

8.d. Answer the question “WHAT is it?”.

Once again choose “Newspaper”.

 

 

8.e. Start filling in as much information as you can, copying from the article, and adjusting the text as needed. Notice the pop-up hints.

8.f. Click “Submit”.

8.g. Compare your finished citation to the citation below.

 

Helpful pointers:

- The section of the newspaper is A.

- A one page article stops and starts on the same page.

 

Robinson, Eugene. "Voter Fraud Is Not the Problem." Washington Post [Washington, DC], 25 Sept. 2012, sec. A, p. 19. SIRS Issues Researcher, sks.sirs.com. Accessed 31 Jan. 2018.

    

8.h. Now compare the manual citation with the copy-paste.

 

Copy/paste

Robinson, Eugene. "Voter Fraud is Not the Problem." Washington Post, 25 Sep 2012, pp. A.19. SIRS Issues Researcher, http://sks.sirs.com.

 

Why are they different?

Possible reasons for differences:

- The correct month abbreviation is Sept.

- National newspapers don’t require a city, so the city of Washington is not needed.

- This newspaper DOES have sections, so the section “A” could be included EITHER as “sec. A”, or the page number could be made “A19”.

- Since there is only one page, “pp” is wrong.  It should be just “p”.

- The access date is optional, because there is a publication date.

- Delete “http://” from URLs, use only the “core” URL.

Note:

- Angela Gibson of the MLA advice page notes MLA’s “recommendation to use permalinks and DOIs when such information is available.”  

- She also suggestions avoiding excessively long URLS that are confusing, preferring instead the “core”, or “host” information, including the domain. “The MLA Handbook advises writers to truncate a URL in one specific way (by omitting the protocol and //). If you need to shorten it further, retain the host, which will allow readers to evaluate the site and search for the source.”

- So, both the citation software and the software that creates a copy-paste citation in a database may not always be right.


9. Student practice: Create a MANUAL citation from a web source.

Create a MANUAL citation from a web source.

9.a. Go to this web page, entitled “Debunking the Voter Fraud Myth”, from the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University’s School of Law website.

9.b. Back in NoodleTools, from the Sources tab, click on “Create a New Citation”.

9.c. Answer the question “Where is it?”.

Choose “Website”, because this collection is not a database.

9.d. Answer the question “WHAT is it?”.

Choose “Web Page” because that is really what it is.

9.e. Start filling in as much information as you can, copying from the article:

- URL: copy it

- Date of publication: find it; if none, leave it blank.

- Most recent date of access: use it

- Contributors: There is none, so skip it.

- Web page or article title: Use the title of the article

- Name of the web site: It is not too long, so use it as it appears.

- Publisher of the site: not needed, because it is the same as the web site.

- Editor: Look for an editor on the “Staff” page.

9.f. Click “Submit”.

9.g. Compare your finished citation to the citation below.

 

"Debunking the Voter Fraud Myth." The Brennan Center for Justice at NYU School of Law, edited by Lorraine Cademartori, 31 Jan. 2017, www.brennancenter.org/analysis/debunking-voter-fraud-myth. Accessed 22 Mar. 2019.

 

Citing your sources within your paper

- How do you cite the article in the body of your paper?

- After the quotation, fact, opinion, or idea that you use in your paper, place your "in-text" citation to credit that source.  Put it at the end of the sentence, before the punctuation mark.

- The citation is usually the author's last name, followed by a page number (both in parenthesis).

- If you use the author's name in the sentence, then the citation is just the page number (in parenthesis).

- If there is no author, use the first few words of whatever the citation starts with in the "Works Cited" list, with a page number, if there is one.

- If the first few words are of an article, put them in quotes.

Notice:

- In-text citations used for the 1st time.

- In-text citation used 2nd or more times consecutively.

- In-text citation used 2nd time, but not in a row.

- Works Cited list at the end.

- Look at the sample page from Purdue University’s writing site.

- You will need to follow the instructions and examples from a reliable source, like the writing experts at Purdue University’s OWL MLA style pages.

 

How do you organize the Works Cited page?  

- The "Works Cited" page goes at the end of the document. Give it the title, "Works Cited".

- Put citations in alphabetical order of author. If there is no author, put citations in order of the first work of the citation.

 

Class Notes

What is a citation?

A citation is all the information you need to tell where an idea or quotation came from, and to be able to find that source again.

 

“What kind of information is included in a citation?”

Citations can include the following information, and more...

- author

- title

- place it can be found (database, book collection, etc.)

- publisher

- city of publication

- date of publication

- medium (type of publication), like Print, Web, File, Film, CD-ROM, DVD, etc.

- date you found it (electronic resources)

- web address (URL) or permanent web identifier (d.o.i.)

 

Note: the medium (type) of publication may be: Print, Web, File, Film, CD-ROM, DVD, etc. and more, depending on the kind of information.

Amity High School, Amity Region 5 School District, Woodbridge, CT 06525, 203-397-4844 Librarians: Robert F. Musco and Victoria Hulse Copyright 2017