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AHS Subject Guides: English: Martin

This guide includes print and online resources for English: Courses include: English Literature, Communication, Expository Writing, Creative Writing, Journalism, Humanities, Reading, etc.

Best Sources for Locating Abstract Expressionism Artwork

English II: Romeo and Juliet

A Retelling Through Abstract Expressionism (updated 3-2019)

Information literacy topics:

-Determining best sources

-Searching strategies for information

-Using technology tools

 

Find the activities for this class, at:

Amity websiteHigh SchoolAHS Library Information Center

Find Online StuffBy SubjectEnglishClass ProjectsMartinBest Sources for Searching for Abstract Expressionism Artwork

 

1. Objective:

To search various websites to locate examples of abstract expressionism artwork. To accurately cite artwork using Noodletools.To print in color.

 

2. Discussion:  

What are some ways you could search for artwork online? Why?

 

3. Presentation: Choosing the best resource and searching techniques.

Explore collections from around the world with Google Arts & Culture, created by Google Cultural Institute.

 

        

Art Resource is the world's largest fine art stock photo archive, with more than 1,000,000 searchable fine art images from the world's leading sources, available for licensing to all media.

 

The collections of the Prints & Photographs Division include photographs, fine and popular prints and drawings, posters, and architectural and engineering drawings.While international in scope, the collections are particularly rich in materials produced in, or documenting the history of the United States and the lives, interests and achievements of the American people.     

……………………………………..

4. Presentation of 3 sources:

a.

“Explore”-top right hand side of screen    

  • Divided into sections: Highlights, Categories, Collections, and Popular Topics.
  • Under Categories, select Art Movement
  • Scroll down until you locate Abstract Expressionism
  • You can sort the artwork by popularity, time and color.
  • Click on artwork and you will see citation information.
  • Copy link IMMEDIATELY if you’re going to use the artwork so you can cite the artwork in Noodletools.

 

b.

Locate “Search” box in upper land hand side of screen

  • Type in “Abstract expressionism” and search.
  • 20 pages of results will appear.
  • Click on artwork and you will see citation information.
  • Click on artist’s name to see more work created by the same artist.

 

c.

Locate “Search” box in middle of screen

  • Type “abstract expressionism” into search box.
  • Limited results
  • Click on artwork and then “About this Item” for citation information.

 

5. Student practice: Citing artwork

Students sign into accounts in NoodleTools, using @amityschools.org Google access.

 

(Students who have not set up accounts this 2018-19 school year can use these NoodleTools sign-up instructions.)

 

Go to the NoodleTools log-in screen.

Enter your @amityschools.org Google account email.

Click “Sign In with Google”.

 

Re-enter your Amity Google account email, and your Google password.

6. Practice: Create a project to begin citations.

Create a project to begin citations.

6.a. Click on “New Project”.

 

 

6.b. Enter a “Project Title”.

6.c. Choose “MLA” style (for this Art class), and click the “Advanced” citation level for full functionality. Click “Submit”.

 

6.d. Write a “Research Question” (think of something related to your topic).

6.e. Write a “Thesis” statement. This is the statement or question you will prove or discuss.

6.f. Click the “Projects” tab to view your project list.

 

6.g. Click on the name of your project to open it.

 

6.h. Click on the “Sources” tab. You are now ready to cite a source.



 

7. Practice: Create an MANUAL citation for artwork.  

Create a MANUAL citation for a artwork.

7.a. Go to this artwork titled: "Painting no. 9".

7.b. Back in NoodleTools, from the Sources tab, click on “Create a New Citation”.

7.c. Answer the question “Where is it?”. Once again choose “Website”.

7.d. Answer the question “WHAT is it?”. Choose “Work of Visual Art” .

7.e. Start filling in as much information as you can, copying from the article:

-Name of container website: find it

-URL: find the "link" underneath the artwork. Do not use what’s in URL

-Artist’s name: find it

-Type of art: What is it?

-Title of painting: find it

7.f. Click “Submit”.

    7.g. Compare your finished citation to the citation below. You can check the

accuracy of your citation by looking at the MLA style guide HERE.

Balson, Ralph. Painting no. 9. 1959. Google Arts and Culture,

            artsandculture.google.com/asset/painting-no-9/HwFlT1kK7DM14g.

               Accessed 11 Mar. 2019.


8. Creating annotations for artwork and Romeo and Juliet comparison.

8.a. Choose a piece of art and complete citation in Noodletools.

8.b. Add annotation

--Describe the artwork--What do you see, notice? Colors used? Shapes? Type of material used to complete the piece? (oil, acrylic, etc?) Discuss the artist. (2-3 sentences)

--Connect why you chose this piece of art and HOW it connects to Romeo and Juliet. Ex. I chose this painting because it represents…(2-3 sentences).

 

    Sample annotation:

Ralph Balson, artist of the piece titled “Painting no. 9” used synthetic polymer paint on hardboard to complete this work. The colors utilized are in the pastel family--light pink, light purple, cream, and a small amount of a rust-color. Balson painted many small dots or circles on the painting, giving it a very peaceful look. I chose this painting because it reminds me of the balcony scene in Romeo and Juliet. The shapes are regular and form almost a type of pattern. The colors used are romantic and light, not dark, which represents the love Romeo and Juliet have for each other during the infamous balcony scene.

 

9. Printing in color: How-To Instructions

 

 

Hysteria Research Project

English II: Modern Hysteria Research Presentation

Modern Hysteria Research (updated 1-2019)

Information literacy topics:

-Determining best sources

-Searching strategies for information

-Communicating new knowledge

-Creating/Writing a research-based product

-Using technology tools

 

Find the activities for this class, at:

Amity websiteHigh SchoolAHS Library Information Center

Find Online StuffBy SubjectEnglishClass ProjectsMartinDatabase Searching and Producing an Annotated Bibliography

 

1. Objective: To develop database searching techniques for investigating topics from multiple disciplines, in order to discuss these themes from essential questions and relate them to specific works of literature. To produce an annotated bibliography of relevant resources found.

 

2. Discussion: The importance of finding credible information for this assignment is important. Why? Where do you start?

 

3. Presentation: Choosing the best resource and searching

        

ABC-Clio American History

    


 

ResearchIT CT


 

4. Presentation:  

Searching strategy, search term “Rodney King riots”

ABC Clio:  American History

"Time Periods" are now the MAIN MENU

-"Time Periods" appear as horizontal scrolling pictures of themed time periods, like "A Nation in Upheaval, 1954-1975" (American History) or “The Power of the Industrial Revolution 1800--1914” (The Modern Era).

-"Topic Centers" under each "Time Period” are the SUB-MENUS.

-Show more specific sub-topics from that era, like "The Vietnam War” or “Nixon and Watergate”.

-Each "Topic Center" includes the following sections:

-"Explore" (textbook-like divisions of events and information, often in chronological order). This is a place for basic information.

Some ABC-Clio databases may give little talking-head video lectures in this section, covering an introduction, several key topics, and a closing. The video lectures are summarized in an outline, and accompanied by a transcript and vocabulary list.

-"Analyze" (critical-thinking issues with potentially opposing points of view)

The "Analyze" section presents issues related to the main topic.  Each issue is presented with a "Key Question", explained in a "Background Essay", and developed in two or more "Points of View". There are “Primary Sources” at the bottom.

-"Topic Center Library" (supporting information and primary and secondary-source material).

The "Reference" section includes “General Resources” like encyclopedic articles and biographies of the major players. The “Media” section has images, audio, and video files. The “Documents” section is where most primary-source documents appear.

- “Library” is a link of all related content within ABC-Clio.

 

Languages: All encyclopedic content written by ABC-Clio gives you the option of translating the text, or listening to it read by a robo-voice (languages currently includes Korean, Arabic, and Chinese). Translation options are not available for other third-party articles or primary-source documents included in the database.

 

Advanced Search:  Not always reliable, but the limiters seem to work much of the time.

 

5. Multi-disciplinary Academic Database: (paid subscription $$$):  

Example:

ESBCO:  ResearchIT CT OneSearch

  • Often used at college level.
  • May include e-books, encyclopedias, periodicals (journals, magazines, etc.).
  • Offer multiple ways to browse or search, but are less concerned with being attractive than school product databases.
  • Information is usually NOT organized in topics; you have to search.
  • Gives more searching options, less “teaching” help.
  • Really useful if you don’t want to limit your search to specialized databases, or you don’t know which databases you need.

6.a. Discussion:  Multi-disciplinary Academic Database:

EBSCO’s ResearchIT CT OneSearch

Main points:

  • Take note of your surroundings:  Look at main menus, search options, etc.. Decide on a starting point for search.
  • Search box:Always give yourself more “Search Options”: Boolean? All? Any? ?
  • Always limit to full-text.
  • Use Advanced search for more power

Use checkbox “limiters” to LIMIT your search by:

  • Full-text.
  • Too many results and not really relevant? Add more words to narrow down
  • Too few results? Broaden your search with fewer words.
  • Save good candidates to look at later.
  • Use more advanced techniques:
  • Try with synonyms or related words.
  • Use commands (“operators”) to narrow down: AND (to get both terms), OR (for one OR the other), NOT (to filter out the word), apostrophes around several words to get the exact phrase

When you identify a good source/article:

  • Follow up on SUBJECT headings that appear in relevant articles.
  • Save your chosen results to avoid losing stuff (use personal lists, email, Save to Google Drive, notes/citation tools, etc.). Add a username and password to save searches and results.
  • Allow pop-ups for Google Drive to work correctly.

7. Student practice: Search for one article that you may use and save to Google Drive.

 

8. Student practice: Students sign into accounts in NoodleTools, using @amityschools.org Google access.

 

(Students who have not set up accounts this 2018-19 school year can use these NoodleTools sign-up instructions.)

 

Go to the NoodleTools log-in screen.

Enter your @amityschools.org Google account email.

Click “Sign In with Google”.


 

Re-enter your Amity Google account email, and your Google password.

 

9. Student Practice: create a project to begin citations.

Create a project to begin citations.

9.a. Click on “New Project”.

 

9.b. Enter a “Project Title”.

9.c. Choose “MLA” style (for this Art class), and click the “Advanced” citation level for full functionality. Click “Submit”.

 

9.d. Write a “Research Question” (think of something related to your topic).

9.e. Write a “Thesis” statement. This is the statement or question you will prove or discuss.

9.f. Click the “Projects” tab to view your project list.

 

9.g. Click on the name of your project to open it.

 

9.h. Click on the “Sources” tab. You are now ready to cite a source.


 

10. Student practice: Create an MANUAL citation for a database article.

Create a MANUAL citation for a database article.

10.a. Go to this article titled: "The Los Angeles Riots Revisited: The Changing Face of the Los Angeles Unified School District and the Challenge for Educators".

10.b. Back in NoodleTools, from the Sources tab, click on “Create a New Citation”.

10.c. Answer the question “Where is it?”. Once again choose “Database”.

10.d. Answer the question “WHAT is it?”. Choose “Journal” .

10.e. Start filling in as much information as you can, copying from the article:

-Name of database: find it

-URL: find the "permalink" on the right, because it does not change.

-DOI (Direct Object Identifier)

-Name of database: find it

-Database accession number: find it

-Most recent date of access: (today) Technically, not required by MLA 8, but you can include it.

-Author: find it

-Article title: find it

-Pages: find it

-Name of journal: find it

-Volume: find it

-Issue: find it

-Publication date: find it

-Series: there is none listed

 

10.f. Click “Submit”.

10.g. Compare your finished citation to the citation below. You can check the accuracy of your citation by looking at the MLA style guide HERE.

 

Davis, Donna. "The Los Angeles Riots Revisited: The Changing Face of the Los Angeles Unified School District and the Challenge for Educators." Educational Studies, vol. 42, no. 3, Dec. 2007, pp. 213-29. Professional Development Collection, doi:10.1080/00131940701632613. Accessed 31 Jan. 2019.

 

A note about copy/paste citations available in databases:

Remember that databases are not always capable of interpreting information correctly, especially unusual author formats, or distinguishing magazines from other kinds of journals.  It is recommended that you ALWAYS create your own citation, plugging in the information.


 

8. Discussion: Creating an Annotated Bibliography

What is an annotated bibliography?

 

An annotated bibliography is a list of sources, arranged like a works cited/bibliography, in which each source has explanatory text after it. Look at this sample from OWL Purdue.  

 

          The annotations included with each source will generally follow this format:     

 

-Summary:

A summary includes an overview explaining what it is about.  

 

-Assessment:

An assessment should be your judgement on the reliability of the source’s author/organization (credentials, expertise, trustworthy, etc.).  

 

-Reflection:

A reflection should discuss in what way is the source relevant and how the source can be used to cite evidence that supports your essential question.  

 

    There are 2 ways to create an annotated bibliography in Noodletools.

-After you have entered the necessary information for citation, click save & add annotation.


 

                                                                                                        


 

                             OR

 

-Insert your annotation under the dropdown on the right under “Options” and select “Edit annotation.”


 

9. Student Practice:

Using the article titled: "The Los Angeles Riots Revisited: The Changing Face of the Los Angeles Unified School District and the Challenge for Educators" write an annotation, addressing the following criteria.

 

Include:     

-Summary:

A summary includes an overview explaining what it is about.  

 

-Assessment:

An assessment should be your judgement on the reliability of the source’s author/organization (credentials, expertise, trustworthy, etc.).  

(For today you can use the librarians’ response.)

Dr. Donna M. Davis, a Professor in the School of Education at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, has over 30 years experience in education. She taught high school English for 10 years before earning her doctorate at the University of Kansas. Dr. Davis teaches courses in the history and philosophy of education at UMKC and has been published in numerous scholarly journals in the areas of urban education, multicultural education, philosophy of education, history of education, arts education, and social justice.

 

-Reflection:

A reflection should discuss in what way is the source relevant and how the source can be used to cite evidence that supports your research.  

 

10. Discussion:

Share samples, compare with teacher’s exemplar.

 

Dr. Donna M. Davis, a Professor in the School of Education at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, has over 30 years experience in education. She taught high school English for 10 years before earning her doctorate at the University of Kansas. Dr. Davis teaches courses in the history and philosophy of education at UMKC and has been published in numerous scholarly journals in the areas of urban education, multicultural education, philosophy of education, history of education, arts education, and social justice. The portion of the article pertinent to my research is how there was a significant decrease in African American students enrolled in the Los Angeles school district following the Rodney King riots. This article questions whether schools could serve a larger role in preventing incidents like the Rodney King riots from occurring again. It brings up the idea that educational institutions could help develop positive relationships/interactions for students of diverse backgrounds.

Amity High School, Amity Region 5 School District, Woodbridge, CT 06525, 203-397-4844 Librarians: Robert F. Musco and Victoria Hulse Copyright 2017