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AHS Subject Guides: English: K. Clark

This guide includes print and online resources for English: Courses include: English Literature, Communication, Expository Writing, Creative Writing, Journalism, Humanities, Reading, etc.

Best Sources for Creating a Reader

Clark, K.

English II

Introduction to Online Sources (updated 5-2019, V.Hulse)

  • Information literacy topics covered
  • Determining the best sources
  • Searching strategies for information
  • Using technology tools

During class:

1. Explain objective: To use provided sources to locate materials to create a reader.

 

2. Present overview of sources:

Locating relevant sources to create a reader

2.a.Poetry Sources    

2.b. Short Story Sources

  • Short Story Guide
    • http://www.shortstoryguide.com/
    • A website that provides titles for short stories and groups them thematically. Search for the PDFs of the actual texts via Google.
  • Short Story Index (books located on cart)
    • A chronological publishing of short stories from 1954 to 2004. The stories are arranged alphabetically by author’s last name and subject. Look up short stories by subject and then locate the actual texts via Google.

2.c. Non-fiction news article/Informational Text

  • Academic Search Complete
    • Access via Amity library website, Find Online Stuff, By Database Name, Academic Search Complete)
    • Filter search results by FULL TEXT, MAGAZINES, and NEWSPAPERS
  • ResearchIT One Search for High Schools
    • Access via Amity library website, Find Online Stuff, By Database Name, ResearchIT CT OneSearch)
    • Filter search results by FULL TEXT, MAGAZINES, and NEWSPAPERS

2.d. Songs

  • Conduct a web search

2.e. Art/Sculptures/Photographs

  • Google Arts and Culture
    • Explore collections from around the world with Google Arts & Culture, created by Google Cultural Institute.
  • Art Resource
    • Art Resource is the world's largest fine art stock photo archive, with more than 1,000,000 searchable fine art images from the world's leading sources, available for licensing to all media.
    • Use the Advanced Search feature.
  • Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Online Catalog
    • The collections of the Prints & Photographs Division include photographs, fine and popular prints and drawings, posters, and architectural and engineering drawings.While international in scope, the collections are particularly rich in materials produced in, or documenting the history of the United States and the lives, interests and achievements of the American people.
    • Conduct a web search.   

Clark: English II, Introduction to Online Sources

William Rocco

English II AND AP Capstone

Introduction to Online Sources (updated 4-2018)

Information literacy topics covered

- Determining the best sources

- Searching strategies for information

- Evaluating sources

- Using technology tools

 

During class:

1. To distinguish between different formats of research materials available online and judge the reliability of information, and to develop and practice searching strategies for relevant information.

 

2. Overview of periodicals (notes are included at end of instructions for reference):

What is a periodical? What are the different types?

- ?

- ?

- ?

- ?

 

3. What are the different types of online databases sources available? (notes are included at end of instructions for reference):

3.A. School Product Database Sites (paid subscription $$$):

Examples:

- ABC Clio World History: Issues

- SIRS

 

3.B. Specialized Academic Databases (usually paid subscription $$$):

Examples:

- PsycINFO (psychology, and related fields, not through Amity)

- EBSCO’s ERIC (Education)

 

3.C. Multi-disciplinary Academic Databases (paid subscription $$$):

- Academic Search Complete

- Jstor (available through Amity)

 

3.D. Database “Aggregators” (sometimes includes book catalogue) .

Offer searching of all or most databases from a single search box.

Example:

- Typical University Library Aggregator

- ResearchIT CT (iConn) (EBSCO database search tool)

 

3.E. Free Web Sites

Example:

- University of Virginia Library’s Mark Twain and his Times

 

4.a. School Product Database Site:

 

4.b.

SIRS, school educational product, with mix of magazines/news/encyclopedic entries, with some advanced functions.

Search SIRS to find a relevant article that addresses your topic.

- Use tools to search for topic, play around for a few minutes.

- Take note of your surroundings:  

- Look for shortcuts or use Advanced Search

- Follow subject leads

- Refine results

- Save results

- Choose an article, skim it.

- Prepare to share one observation that you came up with about how searching works. If called on in class, post your link here.

 

4.c. Discuss

 

5.a. Multi-disciplinary Academic Database:

EBSCO’s Academic Search Complete: Information from many different fields, with a mix of periodicals, and lots of peer-review journals, and a college-level search functions.

Use the same strategies, but it is more powerful, gives more options, less “teaching”

 

5.b. Search

EBSCO’s Academic Search Complete, and find a relevant article that addresses your topic.

- Use tools to search for topic, play around for a few minutes.

- Take note of your surroundings:  

- Look for shortcuts or use Advanced Search

- Limit to Full Text if you are not desperate.

- Refine results with limiters for KIND of material.

- ALWAYS follow subject leads.

- Save results.

- Choose an article, skim it.

- Prepare to share one observation that you came up with about how searching works. If called on in class, post your link here.

 

5.c. Discuss

 

6.a. Free web source

University of Virginia Library’s Mark Twain and his Times, a university project that archives material about Samuel Clemens.

- Created by Professor Stephen Railton

- Organization is very quirky.

- Click through by trial and error to find the best way to search.

- You just have to look through EVERYTHING systematically, and save what is relevant.

 

6.b. Search

 Mark Twain and his Times:  and find a relevant article that addresses their topic.

- Browse the site.

- Identify some information.

- Prepare to share one observation that you came up with about how searching works. If called on in class, post your link here.

 

6.c. Discuss

Additional Tips:

- Get a library card so you can use all ResearchIT CT at home.

- Practice searching from our web page:

- SIRS

- ResearchIT CT for High Schools/ (all the databases for journals)

- Jstor

- You are MORE likely to find something useful for school FASTER from a paid database than from a web search.

- Everything that ISN’T useful has NOT been included.

- Everything you find in a full-text search is really available, as opposed to just being a summary (abstract).

- You can avoid “pseudo-authoritative” sources written by people who confuse opinion with science, and beliefs with objective facts.

 

Citation and Reference Information

How do you cite the article in the body of your paper? In general, MLA format, used most often in English and the humanities, follows an author and page number structure. This means that whenever you include an idea or quotation from a research source into your paper, you write the that the author’s name, and the page number the information came from.  The exact rules for doing this depend on what kind of source it is (print, web, conversation, etc.), and whether or not there actually is an “author”, or even a page number.

Your “Works Cited” page, also known as a reference page or bibliography, will appear at the end of your paper, and must include an entry for every source cited in the body of the text. The rules for creating references also depend on the kind of source, and all references are arranged by author in alphabetical order. Special rules apply when there is no author, or more than one work by an author (see the style guide at the Purdue OWL site).

You will need to follow the instructions and examples from a reliable source, like the writing experts at Purdue University’s MLA style pages.

 

 

Additional Open Web Resources:

Mark Twain’s Huckleberry Finn: Controversy at the Heart of a Classic

This is a teacher’s approach to addressing Huckleberry Finn. Some good links to primary sources.

 

Huck finn in Context: A Teaching Guide, from PBS

This is a unit plan on how to teach Huck Finn. It discusses the issues from the teacher’s point of view.

Developing an Annotated Bibliography

William Rocco

English II

Huck Finn: Developing an Annotated Bibliography (updated 4-2019)

Information literacy topics:

-Determining best sources

-Communicating new knowledge

-Creating/Writing a research-based product

-Using technology tools to create a citation.

 

1. Objective:

To understand what an annotated bibliography is and to produce an annotated bibliography of relevant resources found.

 

Discussion: Creating an Annotated Bibliography

What is an annotated bibliography?

 

Look at this sample from OWL Purdue. 
 

          The annotations included with each source generally follow this format:    

 

-Summary:

A summary includes an overview explaining what it is about.  

 

-Assessment:

An assessment should be your judgement on the reliability of the source’s author/organization (credentials, expertise, trustworthy, etc.).  

 

-Reflection:

A reflection should discuss in what way is the source relevant and how the source can be used to cite evidence that supports your claim.  

  

 There are 2 ways to create an annotated bibliography in Noodletools.

-After you have entered the necessary information to create a citation,  click save & add annotation.

                                                                                                        

 

                             OR

 

-Insert your annotation under the dropdown on the right under “Options” and select “Edit annotation.”

2. Sample:

 

Based on the article titled: "The Los Angeles Riots Revisited: The Changing Face of the Los Angeles Unified School District and the Challenge for Educators" here is a sample annotation, addressing the required criteria.

Dr. Donna M. Davis, a Professor in the School of Education at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, has over 30 years experience in education. She taught high school English for 10 years before earning her doctorate at the University of Kansas. Dr. Davis teaches courses in the history and philosophy of education at UMKC and has been published in numerous scholarly journals in the areas of urban education, multicultural education, philosophy of education, history of education, arts education, and social justice. The portion of the article pertinent to my research is how there was a significant decrease in African American students enrolled in the Los Angeles school district following the Rodney King riots. This article questions whether schools could serve a larger role in preventing incidents like the Rodney King riots from occurring again. It brings up the idea that educational institutions could help develop positive relationships/interactions for students of diverse backgrounds, which ties into my research regarding how schools can address these challenges.

Introduction to Citations/Noodletools

K. Clark

Expository Writing: Research-based arguments

NoodleTools Citations and Notes (updated 4-2018, V. Hulse)

Information literacy topics:

  • Taking notes
  • Organizing source citations
  • References
  • Using technology tools

Objective: To understand and define the concept of a research “citation”, and to use a web citation generator (NoodleTools) to create citations and bibliographic references. To describe three categories of notes based on research, and to write and organize notes online in NoodleTools.

 

Before class: Students have begun to find sources to identify a topic for research, and have some experience with other citation software.

 

During class:

1: Find the activities for this class, at:

Amity website→High SchoolAHS Library Information Center

(tab) Find Online Stuff→By Subject→English

(tab) Class Projects →K. Clark→ NoodleTools Citations and Notes

 

Part A: Understanding and Creating Citations

 

2. Explain objective

Discussion: Review previous experience with creating citations-”What software have you been using to create citations?”  Explain why we use Noodletools.

 

Students brainstorm the answer to the question, “What is a citation?”

A citation is the complete set information you need to tell where an idea or quotation came from, and to be able to find that source again.

 

3. Discussion (OR show video guide): Students answer the question, “What kind of information is included in a citation?”

(Use Google presentation to illustrate concepts during discussion)

Citations can include the following information, and more...

a. author

b. title

c. place of publication

d. publisher (and more about where it can be found)

e.date of publication

f. date you found it (accessed date, electronic resources)

g. web address (URL)

 

4. Discussion: Students analyze sample citation to see which elements it includes.

Students answer: “What kind of source is it?”

Begley, Sharon, et al. "The Anatomy of Violence." Newsweek, vol. 149, no. 18, 30 Apr. 2007, pp. 40-43. Academic Search Complete, web.b.ebscohost.com. Accessed 27 Apr. 2018.

 

5. Students log into accounts in NoodleTools and update “My profile.”


 


 

5.f. Fill in all the information. If you put in your amityschools.org Google address in “Google Account ID”, you will be able to link to Google Docs.

Click “Save Profile”.

 

6. Student Practice: create a project to begin citations.

Create a project to begin citations.

6.a. Click on “New Project”.

 

6.b. Enter a “Project Title”.

6.c. Choose “MLA” style (for this English class), and click the “Advanced” citation level for full functionality. Click “Submit”.

 

6.d. Write a “Research Question” (think of something related to your topic).

6.e. Write a “Thesis” statement. This is the statement or question you will prove or discuss.

6.f. Click the “Projects” tab to view your project list.

 

6.g. Click on the name of your project to open it.

 

6.h. Click on the “Sources” tab. You are now ready to cite a source.

 

7. Student practice: creating a COPY AND PASTE citation for a database article (Academic Search Complete).

Create a COPY AND PASTE citation for a database article (Academic Search Complete).  

7.a. Go to this article from the Academic Search Complete database: “The Anatomy of Violence”.

7.b. Find the “Cite” button on the right side of the screen and find the MLA citation.

7.c. COPY the citation for practice (use MLA format).

7.d. Return to NoodleTools, and click on “Create a New Citation”.

7.e. Answer the question “Where is it?”. Note that the choice here refers to WHERE the source was found, not what KIND of source it is. Choose “Database”.

7.f. Answer the question “WHAT is it?”.Choose “Magazine” (because the citation shows this article was written for Newsweek).

 

7.g. Click “Quick Cite”: Copy & Paste Citation”.  Paste in the citation you copied.

7.h. Click “Submit”. Look at your citation.

 

Begley, Sharon, et al. "The Anatomy of Violence." Newsweek, vol. 149, no. 18, 30 Apr. 2007, pp. 40-43. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=24834402&site=ehost-live&scope=site.

.

You can check the accuracy of your citation by looking at the MLA guide HERE.

 

8. Student practice: creating a MANUAL citation for a database article (Academic Search Complete).  

8.a. Return to the previous article from the Academic Search Complete: “The Anatomy of Violence”.

8.b. Back in NoodleTools, from the Sources tab, click on “Create a New Citation”.

8.c. Answer the question “Where is it?”. Once again choose “Database”.

8.d. Answer the question “WHAT is it?”. Once again choose “Magazine”.


 

 

8.e. Start filling in as much information as you can, copying from the article, and adjusting the text as needed. Notice the pop-up hints.

8.f. Click “Submit”.

8.g. Compare your finished citation to the citation below. You can check the accuracy of your citation by looking at the MLA guide HERE.

Helpful pointers:

Did you fill in the date you got the article?

Did you use the HOME page URL since the article URL was so long and complicated?

 

8.g. Now compare your two citations.

(copy/paste)

Begley, Sharon, et al. "The Anatomy of Violence." Newsweek, vol. 149, no. 18, 30 Apr. 2007, pp. 40-43. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=24834402&site=ehost-live&scope=site.

 

(manual)

Begley, Sharon, et al. "The Anatomy of Violence." Newsweek, vol. 149, no. 18, 30 Apr. 2007, pp. 40-43. Academic Search Complete, web.b.ebscohost.com. Accessed 27 Apr. 2018.

 

If they are different, it is usually because you either did not include all the citation information, OR because the citation you copied from the database was not correct, OR because the citation software is not always right.  What do think are the reasons here?

Remember that databases are not always capable of interpreting information correctly, especially unusual author formats.

 

9. Student practice: Creating a MANUAL citation for a website.

9.a. Go to this document from the FBI website.

9.b. Return to NoodleTools, and complete the steps to make a new citation.

9.c. Click on “Create a New Citation”.

9.d. Answer the question “Where is it?” Choose website.  

9.e. Choose “Government Publication”.

9.f. Fill in all the relevant information. Click “Submit”.

          9.g. Check your citation--Does it look like this?
 

Federal Bureau of Investigation. Active Shooter Incidents in the United

    States in 2014 and 2015. U.S. Department of Justice,      

     www.fbi.gov/file-repository/activeshooterincidentsus_2014-2015.

     pdf/view. Accessed 27 Apr. 2018.

 

10. Discussion: What’s the most challenging/frustrating aspect of creating citations?


 

Part B: Understanding Notes

 

10. Brainstorming and discussion: What is a note? What is the purpose of taking notes?

Purpose of notes: Your notes should be focused on information RELEVANT to your topic.

A. Recording empirical facts

B. Recording author’s conclusions

C. Recording your own synthesis of facts or author’s conclusions

 

Part C: Creating and Organizing Notes in Noodletools

11. Students create a new note.

Create a new note.

11.a. On the “Projects” page, click on your practice project to get to the “Dashboard” tab. Once there, click on the “Notecards” tab.,

 

11.b. Click “+New” to create a new note.

 

Consider this topic: Broad topic, “The Relationship between Mass Violence and Fame”

 

12. Student practice-Read and take note to record empirical facts.

12.a. Use any source you’ve identified and ready an excerpt.  

12.b. Identify a meaningful FACT from this excerpt.


 

12.c. Write a “Title” that represents the basic idea of your note.

12.d. Choose one of your source citations from the dropdown menu (pretend that one of your practice citations is for this source).

12.e. Cut and paste a “Direct quotation”, or a “paraphrase or summary” of the fact you have identified.

12.f. Hint: if you paraphrase, you should take the time to create a well-written note NOW, that could get slotted right in your paper.


 

 

12.g. Click “Save and Close”.

 

13. Convert notes to outlines.

 

13.a. Click the “Add+” button to create a few headings. You can change the name of topics by double-clicking, and rearrange the hierarchy by dragging and dropping.


 

 

13.b. Now DRAG one of your piles, or loose notes, right on top of any outline heading on the right until the heading is highlighted, and DROP it there.  It will now appear as a note in that heading of the outline. You can rearrange the notes in the outline by dragging and dropping.

 

14. Export or print notes.

 

14.a. On the Notecard desktop, click “Print” to export your saved notes.

14.b. Notice the export options.  Choose one, and practice downloading exported notes. Note that choosing Google requires signing into your Google account.

 

15. Create the beginnings of a formatted paper in NoodleTools

15.a. In reality, the “Paper” option does not do any automated formatting. It simply opens a new Google Doc from NoodleTools.

 

My suggestion is to build a paper by copying and pasting Notecards as they are exported to Google Docs. Once all notes are compiled, and you begin writing, you can start to add citations and footnotes, if needed.


 

16. Cite your sources within your paper.

  • How do you cite the article in the body of your paper? In general, in MLA  format, when you include an idea or quotation in the text from a research source, you generally include the author’s name and the page number, where there is one.
  • You will need to follow the instructions and examples from a reliable source, like the writing experts at Purdue University’s OWL MLA style pages or Amity’s MLA Cheat Sheet.

Online Sources for Research

Student Instructions

Clark, K.

Expository Writing

Introduction to Online Sources (updated 5-2018, R. Musco)

Information literacy topics covered

  • Determining the best sources
  • Searching strategies for information
  • Evaluating sources
  • Using technology tools

 

1. Objective: To distinguish between different formats of research materials available online and judge the reliability of information, and to develop and practice searching strategies for relevant information.

 

2..Discussion: What are the different types of online databases sources available? (Find through Amity’s  Library Databases).  Notes are included at end of instructions for reference.

2.a.  Specialized Academic Databases (usually paid subscription $$$):

  • EBSCO’s GreenFILE (available free through ResearchIT CT with library card)

2.b. Multi-disciplinary Academic Databases (paid subscription $$$).

2.c. Library “Aggregators”.

2.d. Open Web Sources

 

3.a. Discussion:  Multi-disciplinary Academic Database:

EBSCO’s Academic Search Complete : (available free through ResearchIT CT with library card)

 

3.b. Practice search

EBSCO’s Academic Search Complete, and find a relevant article that addresses your topic.

Use tools to search for topic, play around for a few minutes.

  • Take note of your surroundings:  
  • Use Advanced Search
  • Limit to Full Text.
  • Use other limiters for KIND of material.
  • Follow subject leads.
  • Save results.
  • Choose an article, skim it.
  • Prepare to share one observation that you came up with about how searching works.

3.c. Share sample, Discuss

4.a. Discussion: Library “Aggregator”..

OneSearch from ResearchIT CT  (available free through ResearchIT CT with library card)

(no practice, because it is the same as all EBSCO databases.)

 

5.a. Discussion:  Open web source

Federal Bureau of Investigation: “Violent Crime, is one of the focuses of the FBI’s work, and a subdivision of its web site.

 

5.b. Practice search

Do a Google Search and find a piece of relevant PRIMARY SOURCE information that addresses their topic.

  • Browse the site.
  • Identify some information.
  • Prepare to share one observation that you came up with about how searching works.

5.c. Share sample, Discuss

Additional Tips:

  • Get a library card so you can use ResearchIT CT at home.
  • Practice searching from our web page:
  • You are MORE likely to find something useful for school FASTER from a paid database than from a web search.
  • Everything that ISN’T useful has NOT been included.
  • Everything you find in a full-text search is really available, as opposed to just being a summary (abstract).
  • You can avoid “pseudo-authoritative” sources written by people who confuse opinion with science, and beliefs with objective facts.

K. Clark

K. Clark

Online Resources

Huck Finn Research Paper

Objective:To understand the characteristics of available reliable print and online sources for research, concentrating on encyclopedic/reference works and popular, websites, and to practice searching these sources.

Amity website→High SchoolAHS Library Information Center

Find Online Stuff→By Subject→English→Class Projects →K Clark

Discussion: quick tour of sources for today’s practice (notes are included at end of instructions for reference):  Types of online databases discussed today.

Search our library catalogs from Destiny Quest to find all our printed books, magazines and journals, textbooks, encyclopedias, music CDs, movies (DVD and VHS).


A number of books have been reserved on the topic and placed on a cart.  See additional resource list.

 

Additional Open Web Resources:

Library of Congress

Mark Twain’s Huckleberry Finn: Controversy at the Heart of a Classic This is a teacher’s approach to addressing Huckleberry Finn. Some good links to primary sources.

PBS

Huck finn in Context: A Teaching Guide, from PBS This is a unit plan on how to teach Huck Finn. It discusses the issues from the teacher’s point of view.

Amity High School, Amity Region 5 School District, Woodbridge, CT 06525, 203-397-4844 Librarians: Robert F. Musco and Victoria Hulse Copyright 2017