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AHS Subject Guides: History: Hastings: Humanities

This guide includes print and online resources for History/Social Studies: Courses include: American Government, US History, Critical Issues, Geography, Law and Justice, Multiculturalism, World History.

Creating Citations and Annotated Bibliographies in NoodleTools

Humanities

Creating Citations and an Annotated Bibliography with NoodleTools (updated 2-2019)

Information literacy topics:

- Organizing source citations

- References

- Using technology tools

 

Objective: To understand and define the concept of a research “citation”, and to use a web citation generator (NoodleTools) to create citations and bibliographic references.

 

1: Find the activities for this class, at:

Google SearchAmity Library

(tab) Find Online StuffBy SubjectHistory

(tab) Class ProjectsHastingsHumanitiesCreating Citations and an Annotated Bibliography

 

Part A: Understanding and Creating Citations

 

2. Discuss objective.

 

3. Answer the question:

“What is a citation?”

 

View the video, “NoodleTools Tutorial Introduction”, Start at 00:41 sec, and eliminate the wait time for responses if needed.

 

4. Answer the question:

- “What kind of source is this?” (see below).

- What parts of the citation can you identify?

 

Zacharis, Thomas. "Beware the Furies." Military History, March 2017, 62. History Reference Center, EBSCOhost (120178125).

 

5. Sign up for your account in NoodleTools.

- Students who have signed on to NoodleTools on or after September, 2018:

- Using your @amityschools.org Google sign-on to log on to NoodleTools.

- Students who have NOT signed on to NoodleTools on or after September, 2018:

- Follow these instructions to create a NoodleTools account.

 

6. Create a project to begin citations.

6.a. Click on “New Project”.

 

6.b. Enter a “Project Title”.

6.c. Choose “Chicago” style, and click the “Advanced” citation level for full functionality. Click “Submit”.

 

6.d. Write a “Research Question” (think of something related to your topic).

6.e. Write a “Thesis” statement. This is the statement or question you will prove or discuss.

6.f. Click the “Projects” tab to view your project list.

 

6.g. Click on the name of your project to open it.

 

6.h. Click on the “Sources” tab. You are now ready to cite a source.

 

7. Create a COPY AND PASTE citation for a database article.

7.a. Go to this article titled: “Beware the Furies”, from the EBSCO publishing company’s database History Reference Center.

7.b. Click on “CITE” in the side of the page.

7.c. COPY the citation (use Chicago Humanities format).

7.d. Return to NoodleTools, and click on “Create a New Citation”.

7.e. Answer the question “Where is it?”. Note that the choice here refers to WHERE the source was found, not what KIND of source it is. Choose “Database”.

7.f. Answer the question “WHAT is it?”.Choose “Magazine” (because it’s from Military History).

 

7.g. Click “Quick Cite”: Copy & Paste Citation”.  Paste in the citation you copied.

7.h. Click “Submit”. Look at your citation.

 

Zacharis, Thomas. "BEWARE THE FURIES." Military History 33, no. 6 (March 2017): 62-69. History Reference Center, EBSCOhost (accessed February 5, 2018).

 

8. Create a MANUAL citation for a database article.

8.a. Go to the same article: “Beware the Furies” as in the previous example, from the EBSCO publishing company’s database History Reference Center.

8.b. Back in NoodleTools, from the Sources tab, click on “Create a New Citation”.

8.c. Answer the question “Where is it?”. Once again choose “Database”.

8.d. Answer the question “WHAT is it?”. Choose “Magazine”, as before.

8.e. Start filling in as much information as you can, copying from the article:

- DOI (Direct Object Identifier): there is none listed

- URL: find the "permalink" on the right, because it does not change.

- Name of database: find it

- Database accession number: find it

- Most recent date of access: (Not needed for this format)

- Author: find it

- Article title: find it

- Pages: find it

- Name of journal: find it

- Publication date: find it

- Series: there is none listed (Not needed for this format)

 

8.f. Click “Submit”.

 

Zacharis, Thomas. "Beware the Furies." Military History, March 2017, 62. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=khh&AN=120178125&site=ehost-live&scope=site.

 

8.h. Now compare your finished citation to the copy-paste citation provided by EBSCO. Look at the differences (possibly due to different chicago versions, and errors in NoodleTools).

 

Copy/Paste provided by History Resource Center

Zacharis, Thomas. "BEWARE THE FURIES." Military History 33, no. 6 (March 2017): 62-69. History Reference Center, EBSCOhost (accessed February 5, 2018).

 

Manual:

Zacharis, Thomas. "Beware the Furies." Military History, March 2017, 62. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=khh&AN=120178125&site=ehost-live&scope=site.

 

In this case, the manual citation is the more correct citation, though the URL might be problematic because you can’t see anything without logging in.

For explanations of differences, see lesson plan link at end of instructions.

 

9. Create a MANUAL citation from an ebook on a website.

9.a. Go to this ebook, entitled “The History of the Peloponnisian War”, from the Project Gutenberg website.

9.b. Back in NoodleTools, from the Sources tab, click on “Create a New Citation”.

9.c. Answer the question “Where is it?”.

Choose “Website”, because this is not a database.

9.d. Answer the question “WHAT is it?”.

Choose “Book”.

9.e. Start filling in as much information as you can, copying from the article:

  • URL: copy it
  • Date of publication: find it; if none, leave it blank.
  • Most recent date of access: use it
  • Contributors--Author: Fill it in.
  • Add another contributor--Translator: Fill it in.
  • Title of book: Fill it in.
  • Publisher: Project Gutenberg
  • Date: Use the most recent update date.
  • Check “Republished book”, because this is clearly a new publication.
  • Year (of the original): Fill it in

9.f. Click “Submit”.

9.g. Compare your finished citation to the citation below.

Thucydides. The History of the Peloponnesian War. Translated by Richard Crawley. 431 BC. Reprint, Project Gutenberg, 2013. Accessed February 5, 2018.

    https://www.gutenberg.org/files/7142/7142-h/7142-h.htm.

 

10. Organizing the Bibliography page

How do you organize the Bibliography page?  

  • The Bibliography page goes at the end of the document. Give it the title, Bibliography.
  • Look at the sample page from Purdue University’s writing site.
  • Put citations in alphabetical order of author. If there is no author, put citations in order of the first word of the citation.

 

11. Citing your sources within your paper

How do you cite the article in the body of your paper?

How do you organize the Works Cited page?  

  • Look at the sample page from Purdue University’s writing site.
  • Notice:
  • Chicago includes two basic documentation systems: notes-bibliography style (or simply bibliography style) and author-date style (sometimes called reference list style). We are using the notes-bibliography style.
  • The basics of the note-bibliography style are as follows: Whenever you need to cite a source, a superscript number is placed in the text at the end of the sentence or part of the sentence. A normal-sized number corresponding to that reference is placed at the end of the page or the end of the section (your teacher’s choice). The first time a source is used at the bottom of the page, the entire citation form is used.  The second time it is used at the bottom it is shortened (see rules).  When the same source is used twice or more in a row, you write “ibid” (which means “the same”), and change page number if needed. The bibliography at the end includes all sources with their complete citation forms, in alphabetical order.
  • You will need to follow the instructions and examples from a reliable source, like the writing experts at Purdue University’s OWL Chicago style pages.

 

12. Creating an Annotated Bibliography

What is an annotated bibliography?

 

An annotated bibliography is a list of sources, arranged like a bibliography, in which each source has explanatory text after it, usually limited to a maximum of 150 words. Look at this sample from U of Chicago.

 

The annotations included with each source can take one of two basic forms, or be a combination of the two, depending on its purpose:

  • Summary: A summary includes information about who wrote the source, where it comes from, why it was produced, and, most importantly, what it is about. It can be general, or detailed.
  • Assessment: An assessment should be your judgment of the source's value, both in general terms of its reliability, and to your work. It should discuss why and how the source is relevant to your research question, and compare it to other sources.  

(This information about annotated bibliographies was adapted from the LibGuides at Columbia College (BC, Canada).)

- Insert your annotation under the dropdown on the right under “Options”

:

- Export your Annotated Bibliography to Word or Google Docs

Amity High School, Amity Region 5 School District, Woodbridge, CT 06525, 203-397-4844 Librarians: Robert F. Musco and Victoria Hulse Copyright 2017