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AHS Subject Guides: History: Norris

This guide includes print and online resources for History/Social Studies: Courses include: American Government, US History, Critical Issues, Geography, Law and Justice, Multiculturalism, World History.

Introduction to Databases

Introduction to Research Resources (updated V. Hulse 10-2018)

Information literacy topics:

  • Using databases

  • Searching strategies for information

  • Using technology tools

Objectives: Understand what a research database is and some of the ways that it differs from a Web search engine, construct and refine searches using database features, and identify citation information

1. Direct student to activity guide online at:

Google "Amity library." Click on first result.

Find Online StuffBy Subject GuideHistory/Social StudiesClass Projects E-ZNorrisIntroduction to Research Resources             

 

2. Initiation: students will conduct a scavenger hunt as a way to expose them to the databases Amity offers, focusing on the databases that will be utilized in World History class.  (10 mins.)

 

3.  Discussion: What is a database?  How does it differ from a web search?  Why should you use them?  

a. Watch video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9LGWhtz_gao​

 

        b.  Top Reasons to Use Databases--designed by AASL.  

 

 

Keyword Searches discussion--Why is it important?  

 

Types of online databases discussed today

  • School product databases

    • Include articles from many different kinds of publications, including proprietary materials.

    • May include e-books, encyclopedias, etc.

    • Include lots of easy access tools, may have overviews on topics (a little like a textbook)

    • Usually divided in subject areas

    • Offer multiple ways to browse or search

    • Examples:

    • Show students how to limit searches: images, video, primary sources, etc.  

    • Demonstrate where they would get citation information

 

  • Scholarly databases

    • Most often used at college level.

    • May include e-books, encyclopedias, periodicals (journals, magazines, etc.).

    • Offer multiple ways to browse or search, but are less concerned with being attractive than school product databases.

    • Information is usually NOT organized in topics; you have to search.

    • Example:

    • Show students how to limit searches: images, video, primary sources, etc.  

    • Demonstrate where they would get citation information

4. Presentation of School Product Database Site:

ABC Clio : The World at War (notes at end of document)

"Time Periods" are now the MAIN MENU

  • "Time Periods" appear as horizontal scrolling pictures of themed time periods, like "A Nation in Upheaval, 1954-1975" (American History) or “A World at War: 1914-1945” (World at War).

    • "Topic Centers" under each "Time Period” are the SUB-MENUS.

    • Show more specific sub-topics from that era, like "Nixon and Watergate, 1968-1975", or “World War I”.

    • Each "Topic Center" includes the following sections:

      • "Explore" (textbook-like divisions of events and information, often in chronological order). This is a place for basic information.

Some ABC-Clio databases may give little talking-head video lectures in this section, covering an introduction, several key topics, and a closing. The video lectures are summarized in an outline, and accompanied by a transcript and vocabulary list.

  • "Analyze" (critical-thinking issues with potentially opposing points of view)

The "Analyze" section presents issues related to the main topic.  Each issue is presented with a "Key Question", explained in a "Background Essay", and developed in two or more "Points of View". There are “Primary Sources” at the bottom.

  • "Reference" (supporting information and primary and secondary-source material).

The "Reference" section includes “General Resources” like encyclopedic articles and biographies of the major players. The “Media” section has images, audio, and video files. The “Documents” section is where most primary-source documents appear.

  • “Library” is a link of all related content within ABC-Clio.

 

Languages: All encyclopedic content written by ABC-Clio gives you the option of translating the text, or listening to it read by a robo-voice (languages currently includes Korean, Arabic, and Chinese). Translation options are not available for other third-party articles or primary-source documents included in the database.

 

Advanced Search:  Not always reliable, but the limiters seem to work much of the time.

 

5. Discussion:  Presentation of a Scholarly database: ESBCO:  History Reference Center and JSTOR.   (Show one article quickly, no practice given)

Main points:

  • Take note of your surroundings:  Look at main menus, search options, etc.. Decide on a starting point for search.

  • Search box:

    • Always give yourself more “Search Options”: Boolean? All? Any? ???

    • Always limit to full-text.

    • Notice what appears when you start to type ¨World War I”. How many results do you get? How does it change when you add “weapons”

      • Notice the number of hits for each Source Type.

      • Notice other “limiters”. Which are useful for our search?

    • Choose a relevant article, and notice the related SUBJECTS. They were chosen by humans.

      • Follow links of related subjects for other similar articles..

    • Use Advanced search for more power

      • Start simple.  You can always add more words to narrow down.

      • Consider what you are searching for: Subject? Word in text?

      • Use checkbox ¨limiters¨to LIMIT your search by:

        • Full-text.

        • “Search modes”, like: Boolean? All? Any?

        • and whatever else is offered

    • Too many results and not really relevant? Add more words to narrow down.

    • Too few results? Broaden your search with fewer words.

    • Save good candidates to look at later.

    • Use more advanced techniques:

      • Try with synonyms or related words (weapons, armament, arms, ammunition, etc. etc.)

      • Use commands (“operators”) to narrow down: AND (to get both terms), OR (for one OR the other), NOT (to filter out the word), apostrophes around several words like “free speech” or “first amendment” to get the exact phrase

  • When you identify a good source/article:

    • Follow up on subject leads that appear in relevant articles (how about “WORLD War, 1914-1918”, “AERIAL propellers”, “MACHINE guns -- History”, ?).

    • Save your chosen results to avoid losing stuff (use personal lists, email, notes/citation tools, etc.). Add a user name and password to save searches and results.

 

Additional Tips:

  • Get a library card so you can use researchitct.org at home.

  • Practice searching from our web page:

    • History Reference Center

    • Researchitct.org (all the databases for journals)

    • Jstor

  • You are MORE likely to find something useful for school FASTER from a paid database than from a web search.

    • Everything that ISN’T useful has NOT been included.

    • Everything you find in a full-text search is really available, as opposed to just being a summary (abstract).

    • You can avoid “pseudo-authoritative” sources written by people who confuse opinion with science, and beliefs with objective facts.


Assessment:  https://goo.gl/b48Ku7

Primary Source Resources

 

Primary-Source Resources

History (example World War I)

History Reference Center

(Find in library Database list).

When you do a search for a topic, you can limit all your results to only primary sources by checking the box on the left for “Primary Source

EBSCO limiter.JPG

…………………………………………………….

ProQuest Historical Newspapers: Hartford Courant

(Find in library Database list).

Since the Courant is a newspaper, any article written near the time of the war can be considered a primary AND a secondary source. When you search for newspaper articles, set the “Publication Date” for sometime BEFORE 1915, 1916, 1917, 1918, etc.

Courant.JPG

…………………………………………………….

World at War (ABC-CLIO Database)

(Find in library Database list).

In the World War I section, look at the links on the left for the different kinds of primary source documents. Click on each format to view those materials.

ABC Clio.JPG

…………………………………………………….

Library of Congress:  “Chronicling America

The U.S. Library of Congress is compiling historic newspapers from many states in Chronicling America. You will find “information about historic newspapers and select digitized newspaper pages...produced by the National Digital Newspaper Program”. One effective way to search is to limit the search years to those surrounding specific events, and then use really broad search terms, like “battle” (for WWI battles).

Chronicle.JPG

…………………………………………………….

Newspapers of Connecticut

This collection includes a sampling (not a full range) of newspapers covering various towns, villages, and topics ranging from 1821-1929. Some of these articles have been arranged by topic, like World War I.

News CT.JPG

…………………………………………………….

Connecticut Digital Newspaper Project

The Connecticut Digital Newspaper project is a learning and teaching site that has material for students, and teaching resources for teachers. The Guides to Newspaper Content include several study units on different aspects of World War I. These units include background material, instructions on how and where to search for primary sources, and some sample search results to start you off.

…………………………………………………….

The British Library “World War One

These article are written by academic experts and researchers.

Look at the themes presented here, including “Propaganda”, or “Civilians”.

Under each theme are sub-topics, like “Children’s Experience and Propaganda”.

Follow the links to related articles.

Primary source images can be found on the side of the articles, in a list of “Related Collection Items”.

…………………………………………………….

PBS “The Great War

Follow through the presentation in order, from the Introduction, through the color coded 4 chapters.

In each section, there is “more” information, and the right side-bar has maps, links, and commentary.

If you get confused, use the main menu.

…………………………………………………….

World War One” from the BBC (England)

This site is set up more like a magazine than a database.  

You just have to browse the different topics, because it is not set up for searching.

Look at guides with titles like: “The Real War Horses”.

Primary source documents here are mostly photographs.

…………………………………………………….

Additional World War One Resources

Tons of other online resources for WWI at WWI Education Resources for Teachers

…………………………………………………….

How to Cite Primary Sources

The Library of Congress’ “Using Primary Sources” provides instructions for citing your primary sources, everything from newspapers to photographs and oral histories. Be careful to check that the versions of MLA and Chicago used are the most recent.

Use Noodletools to accurately cite primary sources.


Norris: Introduction to Citations and Notes with NoodleTools

World History (updated 9-2018, R. Musco)

Introduction to Citations, References, and Note-taking with NoodleTools

Information literacy topics:

-Taking notes

-Organizing source citations

-References

-Using technology tools

 

Objective: To understand and define the concept of a research “citation”, and to use a web citation generator, NoodleTools, to create citations and bibliographic references, and organize notes.

 

1: Find the activities for this class, at:

Amity website→High SchoolAHS Library Information Center

(tab) Find Online Stuff→By Subject→History

(tab) Class Projects →Cumpstone→ Introduction to Citations, References, and Note-taking with NoodleTools

 

Part A: Understanding and Creating Citations

2. Discuss objective.

 

3. Answer the question, “What kind of information is included in a citation?”

 

4. Answer the question, “What kind of source is this?” (see below). What parts of the citation can you identify?

 

Haerens, Margaret. "Breakthroughs in Science." In World History: The Modern Era, ABC-CLIO. Accessed September 19, 2017. http://worldhistory.abc-clio.com

 

5. Sign up for your account in NoodleTools.

Activate your own personal account through your @amityschools.org Google account.

Go to the NoodleTools log-in screen.

Enter your @amityschools.org Google account email.

Click “Sign In with Google”.

 

Re-enter your Amity Google account email, and your Google password.

 

For 7th/8th/9th Grades: (other grades, look here).

Click on “Create a new account”.

Click “Submit”.

 

 

Next:

Choose “I am a student”.

Click “Submit”.

Choose your graduation year.

Click “Save Profile”.

 

Under “My Profile” make sure your  first and last names are complete.

 

 

You are now in Noodle Tools!  

Your new username is your Google @amityschools.org email address and password.

 

6. Create a project to begin citations.

6.a. Click on “New Project”.

 

6.b. Enter a “Project Title”.

6.c. Choose “Chicago/Turabian” style (for this History class), and click the “Advanced” citation level for full functionality. Click “Submit”.

 

6.d. Write a “Research Question” (think of something related to your topic).

6.e. Write a “Thesis” statement. This is the statement or question you will prove or discuss.

6.f. Click the “Projects” tab to view your project list.

 

6.g. Click on the name of your project to open it.

 

6.h. Click on the “Sources” tab. You are now ready to cite a source.

7. Create a COPY AND PASTE citation for a database article.

7.a. Go to this article from the ABC-Clio database World at War, titled “Breakthroughs in Science.”

7.b. Click on “CITE” in the top of the page.

7.c. COPY the citation (use Chigago format).

7.d. Return to NoodleTools, and click on “Create a New Citation”.

7.e. Answer the question “Where is it?”. Note that the choice here refers to WHERE the source was found, not what KIND of source it is. Choose “Database”.

7.f. Answer the question “WHAT is it?”.Choose “Original Content in Database” (because the citation shows this article was written for this database).

 

7.g. Click “Quick Cite”: Copy & Paste Citation”.  Paste in the citation you copied.

7.h. Click “Submit”. Look at your citation.

Haerens, Margaret. "Breakthroughs in Science." In World History: The Modern Era, ABC-CLIO, 2018. Accessed September 23, 2018. https://worldhistory.abc-clio.com/Topics/Display/25.

 

8. Create a MANUAL citation for a database article.

8.a. Go to the same article from the ABC-Clio database World History: The Modern Era.

8.b. From the Sources tab, click on “Create a New Citation”.

8.c. Answer the question “Where is it?”. Once again choose “Database”.

8.d. Answer the question “WHAT is it?”. Once again choose “Original Content in Database” (because the citation shows it was written for this database).

 

 

8.e. Start filling in as much information as you can, copying from the article, and adjusting the text as needed. Notice the pop-up hints.

8.f. Click “Submit”.

Helpful pointers:

-Did you fill in the date you got the article?

-Did you use the HOME page URL since the article URL was so long and complicated?

-There seems to be no published date.

-You can assume that the ID number is the same as a database accession number.

 

Haerens, Margaret. "Breakthroughs in Science." World History: The Modern Era.  http://worldhistory.abc-clio.com.

 

8.g. Now compare your two citations.

Copy/paste

Haerens, Margaret. "Breakthroughs in Science." In World History: The Modern Era, ABC-CLIO, 2018. Accessed September 23, 2018. https://worldhistory.abc-clio.com/Topics/Display/25.

 

Manual with NoodleTools

Haerens, Margaret. "Breakthroughs in Science." World History: The Modern Era.  http://worldhistory.abc-clio.com.

 

In this case, neither citation (original article from a reference database) is completely accurate. The corrected form would be:

 

Haerens, Margaret. "Breakthroughs in Science." In World History: The Modern Era, ABC-CLIO. Accessed September 19, 2017. http://worldhistory.abc-clio.com

 

9. Student practice: Create an MANUAL citation for a database article.

Create a MANUAL citation for a database article.

9.a. Go to this article titled: “British Textiles Clothe the World”, from the EBSCO publishing company’s database History Resource Center.

9.b. Back in NoodleTools, from the Sources tab, click on “Create a New Citation”.

9.c. Answer the question “Where is it?”. Once again choose “Database”.

9.d. Answer the question “WHAT is it?”. Choose “Magazine” because this is an article in a magazine called “History Today”.

9.e. Start filling in as much information as you can, copying from the article:

-DOI (Direct Object Identifier): there is none listed

-URL: find the "permalink" on the right, because it does not change.

-Name of database: find it

-Database accession number: find it

-Most recent date of access: (today's date)

-Author: find it

-Article title: find it

-Pages: find it

-Name of journal: find it

-Volume: find it

-Issue: find it

-Publication date: find it

-Series: there is none listed

9.f. Click “Submit”.

 

Hopley, Claire. "British Textiles Clothe the World." British Heritage, September 2006, 28-33. https://search.ebscohost.com.

 

9.10. Now compare your finished citation to the copy-paste citation provided by EBSCO. Look at the differences (possibly due to different chicago versions, and errors in NoodleTools).

 

Manual:

Hopley, Claire. "British Textiles Clothe the World." British Heritage, September 2006, 28-33. https://search.ebscohost.com. 

 

Copy/Paste provided by History Resource Center

Hopley, Claire. "British Textiles Clothe the World." British Heritage 27, no. 4 (September 2006): 28-33. History Reference Center, EBSCOhost (accessed September 19, 2017).

 

In this case, the manual citation is the more correct citation, though the URL might be problematic because you can’t see anything without logging in.

 

10. Create a MANUAL citation from a web source.

10.a. Go to this article entitled “Women and the Revolution”, from the website:

Liberty, Equality, Fraternity: Exploring the French Revolution, a joint project of the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media (George Mason University) and American Social History Project (City University of New York)

10.b. Back in NoodleTools, from the Sources tab, click on “Create a New Citation”.

10.c. Answer the question “Where is it?”. Once again choose “Website”.

10.d. Answer the question “WHAT is it?”. Choose “Web page” because this online article is really a page in the larger museum web site.

10.e. Start filling in as much information as you can, copying from the article:

-URL: find it

-Date of publication: find it; if none, leave it blank.

-Most recent date of access: use it

-Contributors: find the author

-Web Page or document/article title: Find the article title

-Name of the website: find it (not the same as the publisher)

-Publisher of the site: Find it (bottom of page)

-Editors of the site as a whole: hard to find. We'll talk about this.

10.f. Click “Submit”.

 

Hunt, Lynn, and Jack Censer, eds. "Women and the Revolution." Liberty, Equality, Fraternity: Exploring the French Revolution. Accessed October 6, 2016. http://chnm.gmu.edu/revolution/chap5a.html#.

 

Citing your sources within your paper

-How do you cite the article in the body of your paper?

-Chicago includes two basic documentation systems: notes-bibliography style (or simply bibliography style) and author-date style (sometimes called reference list style). We are using the notes-bibliography style.

The basics of the note-bibliography style are as follows: Whenever you need to cite a source, a superscript number is placed in the text at the end of the sentence or part of the sentence. A normal-sized number corresponding to that reference is placed at the end of the page or the end of the section (your teacher’s choice). The first time a source is used at the bottom of the page, the entire citation form is used.  The second time it is used at the bottom it is shortened (see rules). When the same source is used twice or more in a row, you write “ibid” (which means “the same”), and change page number if needed. The bibliography at the end includes all sources with their complete citation forms, in alphabetic order.

-You will need to follow the instructions and examples from a reliable source, like the writing experts at Purdue University’s CHICAGO style pages.

-Look at the sample Chicago “Footnotes and Bibliography” paper on our History guide.

Norris: Creating and Organizing Notes with NoodleTools

Part B: Creating and Organizing Notes in NoodleTools

 

1. Create a new note in NoodleTools.

1.a. If you are in “Sources”, click on the “Notecards” tab.

If you are on the “Projects” page, click on your practice project to get to the “Dashboard” tab. Once there, click on the “Notecards” tab.

 

 

1.b. Click “+New” to create a new note.

 

1.c. Write a “Title” that represents the basic idea of your note.

1.d. Choose one of your source citations from the dropdown menu.

1.e. Cut and paste a “Direct quotation”, a “paraphrase or summary”, or an original “My idea”.

1.f. Take the time to create a well-written note NOW, that could get slotted right in your paper.

 

1.g. Be sure to add a “Tag” which should represent the specific topic or theme of the note. Be specific, because you will use tags to group similar notes together. Tags with more than one word should be in quotes.

1.h. Click “Save and Close”.

1.i. Create a second note in the same way for the same article, or another article. You need two notes for the next step. You may find that one note obscures the other on the desktop; just drag it off.

 

 

2. Group notes together by common topics/themes.

2.a. Drag one note on top of the other, and release it to create a “Pile” (terrible name).

2.b. Name your “Pile” . A “Pile” name can be a category/theme/topic that both notes address. We are pretending that the two notes deal with the same specific topic.

2.c. Click OK.

2.d. Create two more new notes, and make a new “Pile”.

 

 

3. Convert notes to outlines.

3.a. Click the “Add+” button to create a few headings. You can change the name of topics by double-clicking, and rearrange the hierarchy by dragging and dropping.


 

 

 

3.b. Now DRAG one of your piles, or loose notes, right on top of any outline heading on the right until the heading is highlighted, and DROP it there.  It will now appear as a note in that heading of the outline. You can rearrange the notes in the outline by dragging and dropping.

 

4. Export or print notes.

 

4.a. On the Notecard desktop, click “Print” to export your saved notes.

4.b. Notice the export options.  Choose one, and practice downloading exported notes. Note that choosing Google requires signing into your Google account.

 

8. Cite your sources within your paper. How? See notes below.



 

Class Notes

What is a citation?

A citation is all the information you need to tell where an idea or quotation came from, and to be able to find that source again.

 

“What kind of information is included in a citation?”

Citations can include the following information, and more...

  1. author

  2. title

  3. place of publication

  4. publisher (and more about where it can be found)

  5. date of publication

  6. medium (type of publication)

  7. date you found it (electronic resources)

  8. web address (URL) IF your teacher requires it.

 

Note: the medium (type) of publication may be: Print, Web, File, Film, CD-ROM, DVD, etc. and more, depending on the kind of information

 

Cite your sources within your paper.

  • How do you cite the article in the body of your paper?

    • Chicago includes two basic documentation systems: notes-bibliography style (or simply bibliography style) and author-date style (sometimes called reference list style). We are using the notes-bibliography style.

    • The basics of the note-bibliography style are as follows: Whenever you need to cite a source, a superscript number is placed in the text at the end of the sentence or part of the sentence. A normal-sized number corresponding to that reference is placed at the end of the page or the end of the section (your teacher’s choice). The first time a source is used at the bottom of the page, the entire citation form is used.  The second time it is used at the bottom it is shortened (see rules).  When the same source is used twice or more in a row, you write “ibid” (which means “the same”), and change page number if needed. The bibliography at the end includes all sources with their complete citation forms, in alphabetic order.

    • Look at this Chicago (notes and bibliography style) sample paper.

  • You will need to follow the instructions and examples from a reliable source, like the writing experts at Purdue University’s CHICAGO style pages.

 

Using Research Databases

How to use Library Databases

 

Search our library catalogs from Destiny Quest to find all our printed books, magazines and journals, textbooks, encyclopedias, music CDs, movies (DVD and VHS).

 

School Product Database Sites:

ABC Clio: American History *offers a comprehensive electronic library of historical reference materials and interactive curricular units.  Log in to save your research.

 

The History Reference Center features full text for more than 1,990 reference books, encyclopedias, non-fiction books, and academic journals. This content includes historical documents, biographies of historical figures,  full-text reference books, encyclopedias, history books, historical photos and maps, and historical video. FROM OFF CAMPUS YOU NEED YOUR PUBLIC LIBRARY CARD CODE.

 

JSTOR*includes scholarship published in more than 1,400 of the highest-quality academic journals across the humanities, social sciences, and sciences, as well as monographs and other materials valuable for academic work.  Register for a JSTOR account now!

 

Encyclopedia BritannicaExplore this online encyclopedia with hundreds of thousands of articles, biographies, videos, images, and Web sites.  ​This is through the AMSB Library - please use this login information:
​username: amity    
​password:  bethany

 

Researchitct.org *allows you to read full-text articles from periodicals (magazines, newspapers, journals) via the state library.

**​View all of the online subscription based resources available through the library.

 

Presentation Tools

Objective: To understand and practice how to access and use various presentation tools.

 

Aurasma: Autonomy, a leading enterprise infrastructure company has a new technology that can change the way we look at and interact with physical objects. Called Aurasma, it works with smart phone and tablets to, in real time, turn static images or even objects into videos, games and interactive experiences. Aim your phone at a building and see a video about that building. Aim it at a picture in a newspaper and launch an interactive experience. Watch the demo!

 

eMaze: Emaze features a proprietary state of art HTML5 presentation designer. You can even create your presentation in 3D! The application has a similar style to Prezi when it comes to transitions, but Emaze takes it to the next level. 

 

 

Prezi: Create and present anytime and anywhere!  Welcome to Prezi, the presentation software that uses motion, zoom, and spatial relationships to bring your ideas to life and make you a great presenter.

 

 

Piktochart : Piktochart is an easy infographic design app that requires very little effort to produce beautiful, high quality graphics.

 

 

Popplet : Use Popplet in the classroom and at home, students use Popplet for learning. Used as a mind-map, Popplet helps students think and learn visually. Students can capture facts, thoughts, and images and learn to create relationships between them.  Also available as an app for your device!

 


Amity High School, Amity Region 5 School District, Woodbridge, CT 06525, 203-397-4844 Librarians: Robert F. Musco and Victoria Hulse Copyright 2017